GLC-T vs GLC-TE vs SFP-GE-T: Which One to Choose?


GLC-T, GLC-TE and SFP-GE-T are three Cisco 1000BASE-T SFP types. All these three models SFPs can operate on standard Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair copper cabling of link lengths up to 100 m (328 ft) and support 10/100/1000 auto negotiation and Auto MDI/MDIX. So, what’s the difference between them? In this article, comparison between Cisco GLC-T, GLC-TE and SFP-GE-T will be provided.


Specifications for GLC-T, GLC-TE and SFP-GE-T

By access to Cisco’s relative information, specifications for Cisco GLC-T, GLC-TE and SFP-GE-T are concluded in the table below:

SFP Models Description Operating Temperature Range
Cisco GLC-T 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceiver COM
Cisco GLC-TE 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceive NEBS 3 ESD EXT
Cisco SFP-GE-T 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceive EXT

From the table above, we can see that the difference between GLC-T and GLC-TE is the operating temperature range. Operating temperature range for GLC-T and GLC-TE is respectively commercial temperature range (COM) and Extended temperature range (EXT). The difference between SFP-GE-T and GLC-TE is that the SFP-GE-T has the function of NEBS 3 ESD. Then what does that mean? Let’s read the following passages.

Explanation for SFP Operating Temperature Range: COM, EXT and IND

Operating temperature range:

  • Commercial temperature range (COM): 0 to 70°C (32 to 158°F)
  • Extended temperature range (EXT): -5 to 85°C (23 to 185°F)
  • Industrial temperature range (IND): -40 to 85°C (-40 to 185°F)
  • Storage temperature range: -40 to 85°C (-40 to 185°F)
What Does NEBS 3 ESD Mean?  

NEBS is short for Network Equipment Building System and is a set of standards for building networking equipment which can withstand a variety of environmental stresses. NEBS has three levels: Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3. Level 1 refers to cases where minimum compatibility with the environment is needed. Level 2 applies for limited operability of the product. Finally, NEBS Level 3 (NEBS 3 ESD) certification guarantees the maximum operability of the equipment. It also certifies that the equipment will perform well in harsh environmental conditions and will not interfere with other electronic devices around. NEBS Level 3 certified networking equipment is vital in mission-critical applications. SFP-GE-T with 1000BASE-T NEBS 3 ESD, that is to say, compared to GLC-T or GLC-TE it can take greater stresses with less likelihood of failure, and are therefore a bit more trustworthy in truly mission-critical applications.

Which One Should I Use: GLC-T, GLC-TE and SFP-GE-T

In terms of Cisco original GLC-T, GLC-TE and SFP-GE-T transceivers, GLC-T and SFP-GE-T will be End-of-Sale in June 1, 2017 and replaced by the GLC-TE. So then you can only buy GLC-TE transceivers from Cisco. If you’re dealing directly with a company like a telecom who specifically requires NEBS compliance, they’ll let you know and you should choose SFP-GE-T. But for the most of the networks, GLC-T and GLC-TE transceivers are all you’d need for Gigabit Ethernet, and they cost less as well. Fiberstore (FS.COM) provides all these three SFP modules. We are manufactured to the exact same standards as Cisco’s own brand, and come with true lifetime warranties. Every SFP module in Fiberstore was tested to ensure 100% compatibility, but only cost a small fraction of name-brand alternatives.

Full CWDM Channels Mux Demux and SFP Transceivers Solutions

CWDM systems have channels at wavelengths spaced 20 nanometers (nm) apart, compared with 0.4 nm spacing for DWDM. This allows the use of low-cost, uncooled lasers for CWDM. In a typical CWDM system, laser emissions occur on full eighteen channels at eighteen defined wavelengths: 1610 nm, 1590 nm, 1570 nm, 1550 nm, 1530 nm, 1510 nm, 1490 nm, 1470 nm, 1450 nm, 1430 nm, 1410 nm, 1390 nm, 1370 nm, 1350 nm, 1330 nm, 1310 nm, 1290 nm, 1270 nm. Besides, for CWDM systems an industry standard color coding scheme is used. The latches of the transceivers match the colored port indicators on the passive units therefore guaranteeing simple setup. Following color codes and wavelength are valid for CWDM.


Full CWDM Channels (18 Channels) Mux Demux Solution

The WDM system uses a multiplexer at the transmitter to combine several wavelengths together, each one carry different signal with bite-rate up to 10G and a demultiplexer at the receiver to split them apart. Both mux and demux are passive, requiring no power supply. The 18 Channels CWDM mux demux covers all channels of 1270nm to 1610nm in 20nm increments. Without replacing any infrastructure, it totally support data rates up to 180 Gbps by being completely protocol transparent. The main fields of applications are the use in SDH (STM-1, STM-4, STM-16, STM- 64), IP (Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, 10 Gigabit) ATM and storage (1G, 2G, 4G, 8G, 10G Fibre Channel) networks. Connectors, located on the front of the CWDM mux demux modules, are labeled and use the same color-coding that is used to indicate the wavelength of the individual CWDM SFP transceivers (shown in the figure below).


When fiber availability is limited, CWDM mux demux could increase the bandwidth on the existing fiber infrastructure. By using 18ch CWDM mux demux mentioned above and the 10 GbE CWDM SFP+ transceivers, up to 180 Gbps could be supported on a fiber pair.


Full CWDM Channels (18 Channels) SFP Transceivers Solution

CWDM SFP is based on the SFP form factor which is a MSA standard build. The max speed of this product is 1.25G and they are also available as 2.5G and of course the popular 10G CWDM SFP+. The CWDM SFP has a specific laser which emits a “color” defined in the CWDM ITU grid. The CWDM ITU grid is defined from 1270 to 1610nm and has steps of 20nm. So the available wavelength is 1270nm, 1290nm, 1310nm, 1330nm, 1350nm, 1370nm, 1390nm, 1410nm, 1430nm, 1450nm, 1470nm, 1490nm, 1510nm, 1530nm, 1550nm, 1570nm, 1590nm and C. Besides, our CWDM SFP transceivers are similarly color-coded as the CWDM mux demux to help you match the right link connection (shown in the figure below).


We can make the CWDM SFP compatible with every brand (Cisco, HP, H3C, Juniper, Huawei, Brocade, Arista). A lot of brands have vendor locking and only with the proper coding. Fiberstore is specialized in this rebranding or recoding. We have many different switches and routers in our test lab to test the coding. We also use different Optical Spectrum Analyzers to ensure the CWDM SFP is emitting the right color and has the correct power budget. The CWDM SFP is used in combination with passive CWDM mux demux, and we can provide you a complete solution and advice on which equipment fits best in your project. Please give us your project details and we will provide the most efficient and economical solution.

1270nm SFP 1290nm SFP 1310nm SFP 1330nm SFP 1350nm SFP 1370nm SFP
1390nm SFP 1410nm SFP 1430nm SFP 1450nm SFP 1470nm SFP 1490nm SFP
1510nm SFP 1530nm SFP 1550nm SFP 1570nm SFP 1590nm SFP 1610nm SFP

How to Choose Right Cat5e Cable for Your Network?

Cat 5e (Cat 5 enhanced) is currently the most commonly used in new installations. It’s designed to greatly reduce crosstalk, which means the Cat 5e is better at keeping signals on different circuits or channels from interfering with each other. A step above Cat 5, it can handle 1000 Mbps speeds (gigabit Ethernet) at 100 MHz with a maximum cable length of 328 feet (100 meters). How to choose right Cat5e cable for your network? This article may give you the answer.


Straight-Through or Crossover Cat5e Cable?

RJ-45 conductor Cat5e cable contains 4 pairs of wires each consists of a solid colored wire and a strip of the same color. There are two wiring standards for RJ-45 wiring: T-568A and T-568B. The two wiring standards are used to create a cross-over cable (T-568A on one end, and T-568B on the other end), or a straight-through cable (T-568B or T-568A on both ends). To create a straight-through Cat 5e, you’ll have to use either T- 568A or T-568B on both ends of the cable. To create a cross-over Cat5e cable, you’ll wire T-568A on one end and T- 568B on the other end of the cable.


The straight-through Cat5e cables are used when connecting Data Terminating Equipment (DTE) to Data Communications Equipment (DCE), such as computers and routers to modems (gateways) or hubs (Ethernet Switches). The crossover Cat5e cables are used when connecting DTE to DTE, or DCE to DCE equipment, such as computer to computer, computer to router or gateway to hub connections. The DTE equipment terminates the signal, while DCE equipment do not.

Unshielded(UTP) or Shielded(STP) Cat5e Cable?

Shielded twisted cables (STP) reduce electrical noise and electromagnetic radiation. In other words, they help to keep the signal steady, and reduce interference with other devices. This is done with a shield that may be composed of copper tape, a layer of conducting polymer or a braid, and is covered with a jacket. Unshielded twisted cables (UTP) by definition do not have shielding serving them to reduce interference. They are designed to cancel electromagnetic interference with the way the pairs are twisted inside the cable.


If you’re in any situation where you want to make sure that you get the most speed and efficiency out of your network, you’ll probably want to use shielded Cat 5e. It’s hard to know when and where you’ll run into enough EMI to cause a problem, but if you use shielded Cat 5e in the first place you won’t have to worry about tearing the cable from the wall to replace it if you do run into that problem. Due to the design and nature of unshielded Cat 5e, it is most suitable for office LANS and similar network cabling systems. Unshielded Cat 5e are lightweight, thin and flexible. They are also versatile and inexpensive. When properly installed, a well-designed unshielded Cat5e cable will be easier to both install and maintain than a shielded one.

Length and Color Options of Cat5e Cable

When choosing Cat5e cable for your network, you also need to consider length and color. Cat5e Ethernet cables come in standard lengths such as 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 meter. Longer lengths are available, and you can also have custom cable lengths made. The distance between your various network devices and your network switch or router will determine the length you need. Cat5e cables come in all sorts of colors. This decision can be based purely on your individual tastes and preference. Blue is perhaps the most common, but you might also consider white, gray, or some other color that doesn’t clash with your walls and carpet. Pictures below shows ten colors of Cat5e cable provided in Fiberstore.



Cat5e cable supports up to 100 MHz and speeds up to 1 Gbps over 100 meters of cable. Cat5e crossover patch cable is usually used to connect two same of type of devices. Besides, snagless boot prevents unwanted cable snags during installation and provides extra strain relief.


The table below listed several most popular Cat5e cables sold in Fiberstore for your choice.

FS P.N. Description
22831 3m Cat5e Purple Snagless Booted Unshielded(UTP) PVC Ethernet Network Patch Cable
22842 20m Cat5e Blue Snagless Booted Unshielded(UTP) LSZH Ethernet Network Patch Cable
13826 3m Cat5e Green Non-booted Unshielded(UTP) PVC Ethernet Network Patch Cable
22775 1m Cat5e Purple Snagless Booted Unshielded(UTP) PVC Ethernet Network Patch Cable
13829 1m CAT5e shielded Foil twisted pair (FTP) patch cable w/moulded boots 5 colors optional
22835 2m Cat5e Blue Snagless Booted Unshielded(UTP) LSZH Ethernet Network Patch Cable

Common Mistakes in Fiber Optic Network Installation

When install a fiber optic network, people may make some common mistakes, which were usually overlooked. In this article, I will list the most common ones. Hope to give you some guidance for your optical network installation.

1. Single Strand Fiber Device Must Be Used in Pairs

You will never buy two left shoes, but people often make a similar mistake when they’re working with Single Strand Fiber (SSF). Single strand fiber technology allows for the use of two independent wavelengths, such as 1310 and 1550 nm, on the same piece of cable. The most common single strand fiber device is Bi-Directional (BiDi) transceiver. Two BiDi transceiver must be matched correctly. One unit must be a 1310nm-TX/1550nm-RX transceiver (transmitting at 1310 nm, receiving at 1550 nm) and the other must be a 1550nm-TX/1310nm-RX transceiver (transmitting at 1550 nm, receiving at 1310 nm). The 1550nm-TX/1310nm-RX transceiver is more expensive than the 1310nm-TX/1550nm-RX transceiver, due to the cost of their more powerful lasers. So network engineers may hope to save money by installing a pair of 1310nm-TX/1550nm-RX transceivers. But, like mismatched shoes, it doesn’t work.


2. Don’t Use Single-Mode Fiber over Multimode Fiber

Some people may want to make use of legacy cabling or equipment from an older fiber installation to save cost. But keep in mind that single-mode and multimode fiber are usually incompatible. Multimode fiber uses cable with a relatively large core size, typically 62.5 microns (om2, om3 and om4), and 50 microns (om1) still used in some installations. The larger core size simplifies connections and allows for the use of less powerful, less expensive light sources.  But the light therefore tends to bounce around inside the core, which increases the modal dispersion. That limits multimode’s useful range to about 2 km. Single-mode fiber combines powerful lasers and cabling with a narrow core size of 9/125 microns to keep the light focused.  It has a range of up to 120 km, but it is also more expensive. If you tried to use single-mode fiber over a multimode fiber run.  The core size of the fiber cable would be far too large.  You’d get dropped packets and CRC errors.


3. Understand All kinds of Fiber connectors First

Fiber optic transceivers use a variety of connectors, so make clear their differences before you begin ordering products for a fiber installation is necessary. SC (stick and click) is a square connector. ST (stick and twist) is a round, bayonet-type. LC, or the “Lucent Connector”, was developed by Lucent Technologies to address complaints that ST and SC were too bulky and too easy to dislodge. LC connectors look like a compact version of the SC connector. SFP (small form‐factor pluggable) transceivers usually use LC connector.  Less common connectors include MT-RJ and E2000.


4.Connector Links and Splice Times Also Affect 

Although single-mode fiber suffers from less signal loss per km than multimode, all fiber performance is affected by connectors and splices. The signal loss at a single connector or splice may seem insignificant. But as connectors and splices become more numerous signal loss will steadily increase. Typical loss factors would include 0.75 dB per connector, 1 dB per splice, 0.4 dB attenuation per km for single-mode fiber and 3.5 dB attenuation per km for multimode fiber.  Add a 3 dB margin for safety. The more splices and connectors you have in a segment, the greater the loss on the line.

5. Don’t Use APC connector with UPC Connector

Fiber connections may use Angle Polished Connectors (APC) or Ultra Polished Connectors (UPC), and they are not interchangeable. There are physical differences in the ferules at the end of the terminated fiber within the cable (shown in the figure below).  An APC ferrule end-face is polished at an 8° angle, while the UPC is polished at a 0° angle. If the angles are different, some of the light will fail to propagate, becoming connector or splice loss. UPC connectors are common in Ethernet network equipment like media converters, serial devices and fiber‐based switches. APC connectors are typical for FTTX and PON connections.  ISPs are increasingly using APC.


6. Don’t Connect SFP to SFP+ Transceivers

Small Form Pluggable (SFP) transceivers are more expensive than fixed transceivers.  But they are hot swappable and their small form factor gives them additional flexibility. They’ll work with cages designed for any fiber type and their prices are steadily dropping.  So they have become very popular. Standard SFPs typically support speeds of 100 Mbps or 1 Gbps. XFP and SFP+ support 10 Gbps connections. SFP+ is smaller than XFP and allows for greater port density.  Though the size of SFP and SFP+ is the same, you can’t connect SFP+ to a device (SFP) that only supports 1 Gbps.

High Density Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures for Fiber Adapter Panels and MTP Cassettes

When you’re dealing with fiber optic patch cables in your network, whether your installation is small or large, simple or complex, your fiber patch cables have to terminate somewhere, so make sure you’ve got the right fiber enclosures solution designed specially to protect them. As we know, fiber enclosures are either for patching or splicing applications. For patching fiber enclosures, which can hold either fiber adapter panels (FAPs) or MTP cassettes. Usually a standard 1RU rack mount fiber enclosure can hold 3 LGX FAPs or cassettes, however, a high density 1RU rack mount fiber enclosure can hold 4 HD FAPs or cassettes, which efficiently optimize space utilization and save more cost in rack cable management.


Fiberstore’s FHD series high density rack mount fiber enclosures, including 1RU (FHD-1UFCE), 2RU (FHD-2UFCE) and 4RU (FHD-4UFCE) types, are designed to hold both FAPs and cassettes and can easily mount in EIA 19-inch racks or cabinets, which provide a comprehensive line of fiber distribution enclosures that provide a high density flexible and modular system for managing fiber terminations, connections, and patching in data center application to maximizing rack space utilization and minimizing floor space.

FHD-1UFCE—High Density 1RU Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures

FHD-1UFCE is an unloaded 1RU rack mount fiber enclosure that can support either 4 FHD fiber adapter panels or 4 FHD MTP modular cassettes, up to 96 fibers. Inside the fiber enclosure, you can install either slack spools or splice trays for patching applications or splicing applications, which provides a complete system solutions for connectivity. As shown in the figure below, its size is 44.4mm(H)x483mm(W)x457.8mm(D). Besides the FHD-1UFCE, we also provide a pre-loaded 4 FHD fiber adapter panels fiber enclosure—FHD-1UCE-4HDLCDMMF.

High Density 1RU Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures

  • Related FHD Adapter Panel & FHD MTP Modular Cassette Size

Fiber Adapter Panels and MTP Cassettes

FHD-2UFCE—High Density 2RU Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures

FHD-2UFCE is an unloaded 2RU rack mount fiber enclosure that can support either 8 FHD fiber adapter panels or 8 FHD MTP modular cassettes, up to 192 fibers. Inside the fiber enclosure, you can also install either slack spools or splice trays for patching applications or splicing applications, which provides higher patch field density in fewer rack units saving valuable space. As shown in the figure below, its size is 88.4mm(H)x447mm(W)x414mm(D).

High Density 2RU Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures

FHD-4UFCE—High Density 4RU Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures

FHD-4UFCE is an unloaded 4RU rack mount fiber enclosure that can support either 12 FHD fiber adapter panels or 12 FHD MTP modular cassettes, up to 228 fibers. Splice tray, cable management loops and slack spools accessories of FHD-4UFCE are simple, which assures flexibility and ease of network deployment and moves, adds, and changes. As shown in the figure below, its size is 177mm(H)x447mm(W)x414mm(D).

High Density 4RU Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures

No matter where your cabling is, or what function you need your fiber enclosures to deliver, FS.COM has the ideal fiber enclosure solution. Our fiber enclosures are available in any configuration and feature industry-leading port density. Both rack mount and wall mount fiber enclosures for single-mode and multimode applications are available. All fiber enclosures are highly adaptable and easy-to-configure design, holding FAP Adapter Panels or MTP Cassette with superior cable management, port identification, fiber accessibility and security.

Can I Use SFP Transceiver in SFP+ slot?

A common confusion about SFP and SFP+ compatibility is that if I can use the SFP module in SFP+ slot. When I connect the SFP transceiver to SFP+ transceiver, can SFP+ negotiate down to 1G? Or is it possible to use SFP+ module in the SFP port on my switch? Can SFP+ copper twinax cable can negotiate down to 1G to support SFP? Can 1G and 10G can exist in the same link? All these questions usually create a giant headache for many engineers. After looking up many relevant documentation, now I will conclusion the answers in this article.

SFP Can be Plugged into SFP+ Ports in Most Situations
I’m not sure about the specific switch model, but as a general rule of thumb, SFPs will work in SFP+ slots, but SFP+ optics do not work in SFP slots. It’s just a power availability thing. When you plug the SFP module in SFP+ port, the speed of this port is 1G not the 10G. And sometimes this port will lock the speed at 1G until you reload the switch or do some fancy set of commands. Besides, the SFP+ port usually can never support speed under 1G. That is to say, we can’t plug the 100BASE SFP in the SFP+ port. In fact, for this question, it may depend greatly on the switch models – sometimes SFPs are supported in SFP+ ports, and sometimes not. For example, almost all SFP+ ports of Cisco switch can support SFPs and many SFP+ ports of Brocade switch only support SFP+. Though it’s feasible often, it’s safer to ask your switch vendor for some information.

SFP module in SFP+ port

SFP+ Can’t Auto-negotiate Down to 1G to Support with SFP Module
To my knowledge, unlike copper SFPs which are available in 10/100/1000 auto-negotiation, optics such as SFP and SFP+ do not support auto negotiation at all. In fact, Most (95+%) SFPs and SFP+s will only run at the rated speed, no more, no less. Besides, there is no such thing as a SFP+ that does 1G on one side (towards the fiber) and then does 10G on another side (towards the unit). Though we can use SFP in SFP+ ports in many cases, that doesn’t mean a SFP+ plugged into the SFP+ port can support 1G. In a fiber link, if we plug a SFP in the SFP+ port on one side (1G), and then plug a SFP+ in the SFP+ port on the another side (10G), this may not work! You just can’t have 10 GbE at one end and 1 GbE at the other. For this question, if you use SFP+ copper twinax cable, it also can’t negotiate down to 1G.

When use SFP and SFP+ modules in your network, make sure the speed of both ends of the fiber link is the same. SFP modules may can be used in SFP+ ports, but a SFP can never be connected to a SFP+ module. For their different speeds, transmission distance and wavelength. 10 SFP+ only can use for 10G SFP+ port, and can never auto-negotiate to 1G.

Compatible SFPs for Ubiquiti EdgeSwitch and UniFi switch

The Ubiquiti EdgeSwitch targets the Broadband / ISP / Carrier market, which offers an extensive suite of advanced layer-2 switching features and protocols, and also provides layer-3 routing capability. The UniFi switch targets the Enterprise / SMB market, which is designed for a wider IT audience, and therefore, tend to be simpler, and easier to use. Both these two types Ubiquiti switchs are supported for SFP fiber connectivity and widely used among people. However, which SFPs can I use with my EdgeSwitch or UniFi switch? This article may give the answer.

Which Ubiquiti EdgeSwitch Should I Use?

The EdgeSwitch offers the forwarding capacity to simultaneously process traffic on all ports at line rate without any packet loss. The EdgeSwitch provides total, non-blocking throughput. Among 8-Port model up to 10 Gbps, 16-Port model up to 18 Gbps, 24-Port model up to 26 Gbps and 48-Port model up to 70 Gbps. The following table lists the comparison between EdgeSwitch modules, according to your specific need to choose the right one.

Model Total Non-Blocking Throughput Gigabit RJ45 Ports SFP+ Ports SFP Ports Max. Power Consumption
ES- 8- 150W 10 Gbps 8 N/A 2 150W
ES- 16- 150W 18 Gbps 16 N/A 2 150W
ES- 24- 250W 26 Gbps 24 N/A 2 250W
ES- 24- 500W 26 Gbps 24 N/A 2 500W
ES- 48- 500W 70 Gbps 48 2 2 500W
ES- 48- 750W 70 Gbps 48 2 2 750W
ES- 24- LITE 26 Gbps 24 N/A 2 25W
ES- 48- LITE 70 Gbps 48 2 2 56W
ES- 12F 16 Gbps 4 N/A 12 56W
ES- 16- XG 124 Gbps 4 12 N/A 56W
EdgeMAX – Which SFPs are compatible with EdgeSwitch?

The ubnt edgeswitch provides fiber connectivity options for your growing networks. The 8, 16, and 24-port models include two SFP ports, providing up to 1 Gbps uplinks. For high-capacity uplinks, the 48-port models include two SFP and two SFP+ ports, providing uplinks of up to 10 Gbps. Take the ES‑8‑150W for example, it has 8 Gigabit RJ45 ports and 2 Gigabit SFP ports for 10G applications (shown in the figure below). For SFP ports, we should use SFP modules and fiber patch cable.

Ubiquiti ES- 8- 150W
According to an article titled “Which SFPs are compatible with the EdgeSwitch?”published in Ubiquiti Help Center, the following SFP transceivers are compatible with EdgeSwitch (only listed can be found in Fiberstore here).

SFP Model Description
Cisco GLC-SX-MM 1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m Transceiver
Cisco GLC-SX-MMD 1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m DOM Transceiver
HP J4858C 1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m DOM Transceiver
HP J4858A 1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m DOM Transceiver
Cisco GLC-LH-SM 1000BASE-LX/LH SFP 1310nm 10km Transceiver
HP J4859B 1000BASE-LX SFP 1310nm 10km DOM Transceiver
HP J4859C 1000BASE-LX SFP 1310nm 10km DOM Transceiver
Finisar FTLF1318P3BTL 1000BASE-LX and 1G Fibre Channel SFP 1310nm 10km IND DOM Transceiver
Cisco GLC-T 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceive
Cisco SFP-H10GB-CU1M 1m 10G SFP+ Passive Direct Attach Copper Twinax Cable
Brocade 10G-SFPP-TWX-0101 1m 10G SFP+ Passive Direct Attach Copper Twinax Cable
Finisar FTLX8571D3BCL 10GBASE-SR/SW SFP+ 850nm 300m DOM Transceiver
Finisar FTLX1371D3BCL 10GBASE-LRM SFP+ 1310nm 220m DOM Transceiver
Which Ubiquiti UniFi Switch Should I Use?

The UniFi POE switch offers the forwarding capacity to simultaneously process traffic on all ports at line rate without any packet loss. For its total, non-blocking throughput, the 24port model supports up to 26 Gbps, while the 48-port model supports up to 70 Gbps. The following table lists the comparison between UniFi switch modules, according to your specific need to choose the right one.

Model Total Non-Blocking Throughput Gigabit RJ45 Ports SFP+ Ports SFP Ports Max. Power Consumption
US- 8- 150W 10 Gbps 8 N/A 2 150W
US- 16- 150W 18 Gbps 16 N/A 2 150W
US- 24- 250W 26 Gbps 24 N/A 2 250W
US- 24- 500W 26 Gbps 24 N/A 2 500W
US- 48- 500W 70 Gbps 48 2 2 500W
US- 48- 750W 70 Gbps 48 2 2 750W
UniFi – Which SFPs are compatible with UniFi Switch?

Each model includes two SFP ports for uplinks of up to 1 Gbps. The 48port model adds two SFP+ ports for high-capacity uplinks of up to 10 Gbps, so you can directly connect to a highperformance storage server or deploy a longdistance uplink to another switch. Take the US- 8- 150W for example, it has 8 Gigabit RJ45 ports and 2 Gigabit SFP ports for 10G applications (shown in the figure below). For SFP ports, we should use SFP modules and fiber patch cable.

According to an article titled “Which SFPs can I use with UniFi switch?”published in Ubiquiti Help Center, the following SFP transceivers are compatible with EdgeSwitch. Since among some SFP module types are the same as the EdgeSwitch, I only list the different SFPs here.

SFP Model Description
Fiberstore SFP-1G85-5M

Now: SFP1G-SX-85

1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m DOM Transceiver
Cisco SFP-10G-SR 10GBASE-SR SFP+ 850nm 300m DOM Transceiver
Fiberstore SFP-10G85-3M


10GBASE-SR SFP+ 850nm 300m DOM IND Transceive
Ubiquiti Compatible SFPs in Fiberstore

Fiberstore (FS.COM) provides a series of Ubiquiti compatible SFP transceivers that can be used with EdgeSwitch and UniFi switch. In Ubiquiti Networks Community SFP modules compatibility section, some people tested Fiberstore SFP modules in their EdgeSwitch. As shown in the figure below, SFP1G-SX-85, SFP1G-SX-31 and SFP-10GSR-85 SFPs are working.


What Is The Difference: SFP vs SFP+

As we know, a SFP module just looks the same as the SFP+ module. And most switches can both support SFP module and SFP+ module. So, do these two modules really refer to the same one? What’s the difference between them?


SFP Definition
SFP stands for Small Form-factor Pluggable. It is a hot-pluggable transceiver that plugs into the SFP port of a network switch and supports SONET, Gigabit Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and other communications standards. SFP specifications are based on IEEE802.3 and SFF-8472. They are capable of supporting speeds up to 4.25 Gbps. Due to its smaller size, SFP replaces the formerly common gigabit interface converter (GBIC). Therefore SFP is also called Mini-GBIC. By choosing different SFP module, the same electrical port on the switch can connect to different fiber types (multimode or single-mode) and different wavelengths.

SFP module Cisco

SFP+ Definition
Since SFP supports only up to 4.25 Gbps, SFP+ that supports data rates up to 16 Gbps was later introduced. In fact, SFP+ is an enhanced version of the SFP. The SFP+ specifications are based on SFF-8431. In today’s most applications, SFP+ module usually supports 8 Gbit/s Fibre Channel, 10 Gigabit Ethernet and Optical Transport Network standard OTU2. In comparison to earlier 10 Gigabit Ethernet XENPAK or XFP modules, SFP+ module is smaller and becomes the most popular 10 Gigabit Ethernet module in the market.

SFP+ module Cisco

Review the SFP and SFP+ definition mentioned above, we can know that the main difference between SFP and SFP+ is the data rate. And due to different data rate, the applications and transmission distance is also different.

Ethernet Application

SFP (1Gbps) SFP+ (10Gbps)
1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m

1000BASE-LX/LH SFP 1310nm 20km

1000BASE-EX SFP 1310nm 40km

1000BASE-ZX SFP 1550nm 80km

10GBASE-SR SFP+ 850nm 300m

10GBASE-LRM SFP+ 1310nm 220m

10GBASE-LR SFP+ 1310nm 10km

10GBASE-ER SFP+ 1550nm 40km

10GBASE-ZR SFP+ 1550nm 100km

Fiber Channel Application

SFP (2G, 4G) SFP+ (8G)

2G Fibre Channel SFP 1310nm 2km/15km/20km/40km

2G Fibre Channel SFP 1510nm 80km


4G Fibre Channel SFP 850nm 150m

4G Fibre Channel SFP 1310nm 5km/10km/15km/20km


8G Fibre Channel SFP+ 850nm 150m

8G Fibre Channel SFP+ 1310mn 10km/20km/40km

8G Fibre Channel SFP+ 1510nm 80km

SONET/SDH Application

SFP (155Mbps, 622Mbps, 2.5Gbps) SFP+ (10G)

OC-3/STM-1 1310nm 2km/15km/40km

OC-3/STM-1 1510nm 80km


OC-12/STM-4 1310nm 500m/2km/15km/40km

OC-12/STM-4 1510nm 80km


OC-48/STM-16 1310nm 2km/15km/40km

OC-48/STM-16 1510nm 80km

OC-192/STM-64 850nm 300m

OC-192/STM-64 1310nm 2km/10km/20km/40km

OC-192/STM-64 1510nm 80km

Usually, SFP module plugs into SFP port of the switch and SFP+ module plugs into SFP+ port of the switch. But, sometimes SFP module can also be plugged into SFP+ port. Which SFP or SFP+ module should you choose all depends on your switch types. Fiberstore is a reliable SFP transceiver module manufactures, all SFP module and SFP+ module types are available in FS.COM. Besides, SFP+ cable is also provided. What’s more, the price of SFP module and SFP+ module is lower than many other manufactures. SFP test is strict in FS.COM. Matching fiber patch cable is also available.

How to Choose the Right Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures?

Fiber enclosure can provide easy-to-manage cabling environments and strong protection for fiber optic cables. Since more and more cables used in today’s data centers, high-density cable management tools also become more popular and essential than before. However, there are so many fiber enclosure manufacturers and suppliers, and the rack mount fiber enclosures supplied therefore available in different sizes and applications. How to choose the rack mount fiber enclosures for your network?

Rack Mount Enclosures Configurations
The rack mount fiber enclosure is generally made for standard 19 inch rack mounting. Depending on the number of connections required, they are available in one or more rack units (RU) height configurations, such as 1RU, 2RU or 4RU, etc. See the picture below, you should choose the most proper one depending on the space and port requirement of your network.

fiber enclosures

Rack Mount Enclosures Mount Types
1RU rack mount fiber enclosures are the most commonly used size in data center server racks cable management. For convenient installation and cable management, there are cover removable, slide-out and swing-out three mount types fiber enclosures to choose from. The cover removable type is an early type of fiber enclosures. If your budget is sufficient, I will recommend you to use the slide-out type or swing-out type though they are more expensive than the cover removable type. But you may get more benefits during installation and maintenance, as they respectively feature a convenient slide-out support tray and an integrated swing-out tray so that you don’t need to remove the whole enclosure from the rack to gain internal access.


Rack Mount Fiber Enclosures Applications
Fiber enclosure has various designs and applications. There are mainly three ways to use the fiber enclosures, which are depended on the accessories that are installed on the fiber enclosure. The following will take a slide-out 1RU rack mount fiber enclosure as example to illustrate the applications of the fiber enclosures in data center. Installed with splice trays, fiber adapter panels and MTP cassettes separately, fiber enclosure can provide cabling environment for different connections.

Application 1: Installing splice tray and FAPs
Installing four fiber adapter panels on the front panel and one or more splicing trays inside the enclosure drawer. This fiber enclosure can provide cable management and protection for splicing joints and connections.

splice tray and fiber adapter panels
Application 2: Installing Spools and FAPs
Installing two spools on the enclosure drawer and four FAPs on the front panel, this fiber enclosure can provide flexible high density cabling for fiber patch cables.

Spools and fiber adapter panels
Application 3: Installing HD MTP Cassettes
Up to four MTP Cassettes can be installed in this 1U fiber enclosure, which can provide 40G/100G to 10G high cabling density and easy transferring from MTP interface to LC interface.

MTP Cassettes

After reading the passage, we know that rack mount fiber enclosures may be available in different sizes, mount types and applications. Thus to choose a right fiber enclosure seems not a simple thing. FS.COM offers a wide range of rack mount enclosures, as well as custom service, which can help address all kinds of your requirements. For more details, please contact us via or call 24/7 Customer Service: 1 (718) 577 1006.

Related Article: Upgrade to 40G / 100G Networks with High-Density Fiber Enclosures

Why Not Use Cable Lacing Bars to Manage Your Messy Cables?

Cable lacing bars, also called lacer bars, consist of a metal bar that mounts to the rear of a standard 19″ rack or cabinet, behind a patch panel. These bars provide support and management of cables that are secured to the bar with cable ties or adjustable clips. Each cable lacing bar occupies 1/3 to 2/3 of a rack space and can secure and manage up to 24 cables in 1 RU. They are usually used to support and manage cables in telecommunication rooms, which provide strain relief, bend radius control, superior aesthetics and improve organisation and routing of cable.

cable lacing bars

How to Use the Cable Lacing Bars?
In fact, the process of installing a cable lacing bar is very easy. As shown in the figure below, we only need to install the cable lacing bar to the rack firstly, and then use the cable tie to fix the cables to the cable lacing bar.

lacing bars

Which Type Cable Lacing Bars Should I Choose?
In order to meet different cabling management needs, there are also many different cable lacing bars available in the market. Below some common cable lacing bars are listed, and you can choose the right one for your network according to your specific cabling environment.
1. Round Lacer Bars
Use the 1RU round lacer bar when a small profile is required and for lacing small or individual horizontal cable runs. 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

Round Lacer Bars
2. Rectangular Lacer Bars
Use the 1RU aluminum lacer bar when lacing cables vertically or horizontally. Aluminum construction provides the ability to drill holes to attach tie saddles, mount electrical boxes, etc. This lacer bar can also be used to support the rear of equipment. 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

Rectangular Lacer Bars
3. L-Shaped Lacer Bars
“L” shaped lacer bars are strong and provide fixed tie points. Recommended for larger runs of cable. They are available in 2”, 4” and 6” offset. Choose the appropriate offset bar based on the distance from the rear of equipment to the rack rail.

L-Shaped Lacer Bars
4. Round Lacer Bars with Offset
Use the round lacer bar with offset when lacing small bundles or individual cables off the rear of equipment, patch panels and other components to relieve cable stress from the connections. They are available in 1.5” offset and 4” offset respectively (figure below). Choose the appropriate offset based on the distance from the rear of equipment to the rack rail. 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

Round Lacer Bars with Offset
5. 90º Bend Lacer Bars
These 90° bend offset lacer bars are similar to other offset round lacer bars, but feature 90° bends to provide full-width support. Can also be used to provide clearance around components that extend past the rear rack rail (16-5/8” open width). 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

90º Bend Lacer Bars
6. Horizontal Lacer Panel
Use the horizontal lacer panel for lacing large amounts of cable or mounting devices. Two rack space high, the horizontal lacer panel features a large flange, numerous cable tie points and more surface for mounting.

Horizontal Lacer Panel

Cable lacing bars are a useful and cost effective cable management solution for rack or enclosure systems. These bars are essential in helping avoid cable strain especially when trying to run cables from one side of the enclosure to the other. FS.COM offers a full line of cable lacing bars to fit a variety of applications offering end users flexibility and convenience to prevent cable strain. Higher density applications may be addressed with FS.COM cable manager.