Simplify the Implementation of High Density 100G/120G CXP

FacebookTwitterGoogle+LinkedInRedditTumblrShare

Data center bandwidth demands continue to grow, requiring higher capacity and throughput. The 100G/120G Ethernet is no longer new in data center optic market, but it’s still a complex act to efficiently and effectively upgrade existing 10G/40G architectures to these higher data rates, especially in a space-constrained application. In order to explore the approaches of smooth migration to high density 100G/120G network, this post will take multimode 100G/120G CXP module as example, and illustrate some simplified scenarios when upgrading to these higher data rates.

Overview on 100G/120G CXP Module

High density 100G/120G CXP is very popular in the implementations up to 100Gbps for saving-space. This deployment can then leverage the 10G-per-lane channels to distribute the 10G data anywhere in the data center. 100G/120G CXP module is designed to connect with an MTP/MPO-24 connector, which can be divided to 10x10G or 12x10G transceiver pairs. For 120G CXP, it is also possible to separate the signals into three QSFP+ transceivers, and then to three groups of 4x10G transceivers by using an 8 fibers MTP/MPO to LC breakout module or cable.

Direct Connectivity for two CXPs

For two 100GBASE-SR10 modules, direct link can be easily made via 100G MPO cable. For connecting two 120G CXPs, a cost-effective 24 fibers MPO trunk can also work well. Here uses an 24 fibers MPO (female) to MPO (female) OM4 polarity B trunk cable.

direct link for two 100G/120G CXP modules

Figure 1: direct link for two 100G/120G CXP modules.

Connectivity Methods for CXP and SFP+/QSFP+

In this part, the scenarios applied for 100G to 10G connection, and 120G to 40G or 10G connection will be explained.

100G to 10G

Figure 2 shows a direct link for one 100G CFP module and ten 10G SFP+ modules. By using the 24 fibers MPO to LC duplex harness cable, the whole 100G from the CFP transceiver is connected to ten SFP+ transceivers (two LC duplex legs are not used in this link). The fanout legs are available to be the same length or staggered type, so as to meet different applications.

direct link for a 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s

Figure 2: direct link for a 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s.

In figure 3, the interconnect for CFP and SFP+ transceivers is more flexible than the direct link. Here the 160 fibers MTP/MPO (male) breakout patch panel allows connectivity to any duplex path reachable by the patch panel. This method offers ultimate flexibility in allowing connectivity to any row, rack or shelf. Moreover, this breakout module can support up to eight groups of this 100G to 10x10G transmission. In such a high density link, it is suggested to use HD patch cables or LC uniboot patch cables to enable quicker and better cable management.

interconnect solution for 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s

Figure 3: interconnect solution for 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s.

120G to 10G and 40G

When directly connecting one 120G CXP to twelve 10G SFP+ transceivers, a 24 fibers MTP-24 to 12 LC harness cables can do the job well. Here we use a customized high density bend insensitive female MTP-24 to 12 LC duplex OM4 breakout cable.

 direct link for 120G to 12x10G transceivers

Figure 4: direct link for 120G to 12x10G transceivers.

An option for breaking out a 120G CXP to three 40G QSFP+s is to use the 1×3 MTP/MPO conversion harness cable. Figure 5 illustrates implementation of a 1×24 strand MTP to 3×8 strand MTP conversion harness cable. Like the 12x10G segregation mentioned above, once split, the 3×8-fiber QSFP+ channels can be distributed through patch panels and 12-fiber based trunking to any area of the data center.

hybrid link for 120G CXP to 40G QSFP+s and 10G SFP+s

Figure 5: hybrid link for 120G CXP to 40G QSFP+s and 10G SFP+s.

Conclusion

This article has illustrated some simplified implementation examples of 100G/120G CXP modules. 24 fibers MTP/MPO trunk cable are suited for connecting two CXP modules. Breakout cables can achieve quick connection for CXP and QSFP+ or SFP+ optics, but when flexible patching is needed in the link, it would be better to adopt breakout patch panel. If you need 100G optics, FS.COM can offer you fully tested compatible 100GBASE-SR10, 100GBASE-SR4, 100GBASE-LR4 and 100GBASE-ER4 transceivers, etc.

What Is IPv4 & IPv6 Dual Stack and MPLS Technique?

We usually see the switch products description as the following “Hardware support for IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack and rich MPLS features provide customers with a wealth of business features and routing functions, as well as hardware-based security features”. Then, what’s the IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack? What does the “MPLS” mean?

What Is IPv4 & IPv6 Dual Stack?
As we all know, the entire Internet world is currently running IPv4 (Internet Protocol Version 4). But we’ve run completely out of current IPv4-type addresses. So a new IP address format called IPv6 appears. The IPv6 format creates an IP address with a much longer number, which allows for a great many more IP addresses—so many, we should never run out again! Here’s an example of the difference between the two formats:

  • Sample IPv4 address: 192.168.1.2
  • Sample IPv6 address: 2001:0578:0123:4567:89AB:CDEF:0123:4567

One significant problem is that the two IP address formats aren’t compatible and total conversion to IPv6 is a way off. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) need to provide their customers with both IPv4 and IPv6 service. How to solve this problem? The answer is IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack. With the dual stack solution, every networking device, server, switch, router and firewall in an ISP’s network will be configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity capabilities. Most importantly, dual stack technology allows ISPs to process IPv4 and IPv6 data traffic simultaneously.

IPv4 & IPv6 Dual Stack

MPLS Technique Explanation
MPLS stands for “Multi-Protocol Label Switching”. It is a type of data-carrying technique for high-performance telecommunications networks. In a traditional IP network, each router performs an IP lookup, determines a next-hop based on its routing table, and forwards the packet to that next-hop. Rinse and repeat for every router, each making its own independent routing decisions, until the final destination is reached.

Multi-Protocol Label Switching_mpls

MPLS does “label switching” instead. The first device does a routing lookup, just like before. But instead of finding a next-hop, it finds the final destination router. And it finds a pre-determined path from “here” to that final router. The router applies a “label” based on this information. Future routers use the label to route the traffic without needing to perform any additional IP lookups. At the final destination router the label is removed. And the packet is delivered via normal IP routing.

Due to the labeling technology, the speed of performing lookups for destinations and routing is much faster than the standard IP table lookups non-MPLS routers have to perform. Besides, MPLS networks achieve greater Quality of Service (QoS) for their customers. FS.COM S5800-48F4S routing switches support for IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack and rich MPLS features and enhanced multicast and QoS capabilities can provide customers with a wealth of business features and routing functions, as well as hardware-based security features.

Layer 2 vs Layer 3 Switch: What’s the Difference?

Over the years, the average network has been dominated by the Layer 2 switch. Now as network complexity increases and applications demand greater functions from the network, Layer 3 switches are coming out of the data center and high level enterprise settings. Why this happens? What’s the difference between Layer 2 and Layer 3 switch? Which one should I deploy?

Layer 2 vs Layer 3 Switch
The main function of a Layer 2 is to help the traffic from devices within a LAN reach each other. A Layer 2 switch does this by keeping a table of all the MAC addresses it has learned and what physical port they can be found on. The MAC address is something that operates within Layer 2 of the OSI model (what defines how networks operate). Traffic being switched by MAC address is isolated within the LAN those devices are using. Therefore, when you need traffic to cross between LANs (or VLANs) is when we need a Layer 3 switch.

Layer 2 Switch

The most common Layer 3 device used in a network is the router. A router is able to look into the Layer 3 portion of traffic passing through it (the source and destination IP addresses) to decide how it should pass that traffic along. Since a router holds information about multiple networks (LAN WAN VLAN) it is also able to pass traffic along between these networks. This is routing. The Layer 3 switch functionally exists somewhere between being a Layer 2 switch and being a Gateway Router. It can be best described by what more it does compared to a Layer 2 switch and what less it does compared to a Gateway Router.

Layer 3 Switch

What Makes Layer 3 Switch Different?
When comparing the Layer 2 switch to a Layer 3 switch the first thing to look at is what additional software functionality you are getting. When a switch supports Dynamic Routing Protocols, it’s no longer a strictly Layer 2 switch. Because static routing allows traffic to be routed between VLANs. In fact, the switches that add only Static Routing to their software features are considered to be somewhere between a Layer 2 and full Layer 3 switch. Sometimes called Layer 2+ or Layer 3 Lite. Unlike Layer 2+ switch, Layer 3 switch is Dynamic Routing ,which are used to link large networks together and share routing tables between them. They can also allow for dynamic routing of multicast traffic on the network.

To Choose a Layer 2 Switch or Layer 3 Switch?
Now that we know the difference between the two layers, what metrics would you choose one over the other comes down to the flexibility of being able to route the packets. If you need to send data within a LAN, use Layer 2 switch. If you need to send the data to other buildings on campus or to a client site, use Layer 3 switch. FS.COM provides a series of Layer2/3 10G/40G/100G switches to meet Data Center and Enterprise Ethernet network requirements. If you are interested, welcome to visit our website www.fs.com or contact us via sales@fs.com for more detailed information.

100G CFP Modules Power and Connectors Comparison

In today’s market, only several vendors can provide 100G CFP modules, such as Cisco, Juniper, Brocade and Huawei. In this blog, I will compare the Cisco CFP modules and the Juniper CFP modules, and analyze the power and connectors of these modules.

100GBASE-SR10 CFP Modules
Both Cisco CFP-100G-SR10 and Juniper CFP-100GBASE-SR10 CFP module supports link lengths of 100 meters and 150 meters respectively on laser-optimized OM3 and OM4 multifiber cables. It primarily enables high-bandwidth 100-gigabit links over 24-fiber ribbon cables terminated with MPO/MTP-24 connectors. It can also be used in 10 x 10 Gigabit Ethernet mode along with ribbon to duplex fiber breakout cables for connectivity to ten 10GBASE-SR optical interfaces.

100GBASE-SR10 CFP Modules

100GBASE-LR4 CFP Modules
Both Cisco CFP-100G-LR4 and Juniper CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4 CFP module supports a link length of 10 kilometers on standard duplex single-mode fiber (SMF, G.652). However, the connectors of Cisco CFP-100G-LR4 are duplex SC, and the connectors of Juniper CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4 are duplex LC. 100 Gigabit Ethernet signal is carried over four wavelengths. Multiplexing and demultiplexing of the four wavelengths are managed within the device.

100GBASE-LR4 CFP Modules

100GBASE-ER4 CFP Modules
Both Cisco CFP-100G-ER4 and Juniper CFP-GEN2-CGE-ER4 CFP module can support link lengths up to 40 kilometers on standard duplex single-mode fiber (SMF, G.652). Like the 100GBASE-LR4 CFP modules, the connectors of Cisco CFP-100G-ER4 are duplex SC, and the connectors of Juniper CFP-GEN2-CGE-ER4 are duplex LC. Multiplexing and demultiplexing of the four wavelengths are managed within the device. The 100GBASE-ER4 CFP module meets the IEEE 802.3ba requirements for 100GBASE-ER4 performance and also supports Digital Optical Monitoring (DOM) of the transmit-and-receive optical signal levels.

Tx/Rx Power of Cisco and Juniper 100G CFP Modules
Minimum and maximum Tx/Rx Power of Cisco and Juniper 100G CFP Modules are displayed in the table below. We can see that there is no significant difference between Tx/Rx Power of Cisco and Juniper CFP modules.

P/N Connector Transmit Power Receive Power Wavelength
Cisco CFP-100G-SR10 OM3 100 m; OM4 150 m 24F-MPO/MTP min: -7.6 dBm
ma: -1.0 dBm
min: -9.5 dBm
max: 2.4 dBm
Ten lanes, 840 to 850 nm
Juniper CFP-100GBASE-SR10 OM3 100 m; OM4 150 m 24F-MPO/MTP min: -7.6 dBm
max: 2.4 dBm
min: -9.5 dBm
max: 2.4 dBm
840 through 860 nm
Cisco CFP-100G-LR4 10km duplpx SC min: -4.3 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
min: -10.6 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
Four lanes, 1295.6 nm, 1300.1 nm, 1304.6 nm, and 1309.1 nm
Juniper CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4 10km duplpx LC min: -4.3 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
min: -10.5 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
1294.53 through 1296.59 nm
1299.02 through 1301.09 nm
1303.54 through 1305.63 nm
1308.09 through 1310.19 nm
Cisco CFP-100G-ER4 40km duplpx SC min: -2.9 dBm
max: 2.9 dBm
min: –20.9 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
Same as CFP-100G-LR4
Juniper CFP-GEN2-CGE-ER4 40km duplpx LC min: -2.9 dBm
max: 2.9 dBm
min: –20.9 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
Same as CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4

As a leading and professional manufacturer and supplier of fiber optic subsystems and components. Fiberstore offers various 100G CFP modules which are ideal solutions for your 100GbE network. Our 100G transceivers are with high compatibility that can be compatible with many major brands. For more information, please contact us over sales@fs.com.

10G SFP+ DAC Cables for Intel X520 Adapter

SFP+ Direct Attach Cables integrate SFP+ compatible connectors with a copper cable into a low-latency, energy-efficient, and low-cost solution. DAC are available in several lengths up to 10 meters (33 ft) and are currently the best cabling option for short 10 Gigabit Ethernet connections.

10G-sfp-passive-copper-cable

Top-of-Rack (ToR) switches use the SFP+ form factor to provide high port density 10 Gigabit Ethernet in an efficient 1U form factor. Server and network storage vendors use 10 Gigabit SFP+ network adapters on their equipment for the same reason. DAC simplify rack cabling and termination. Each server and network storage device can be directly connected to the ToR switch, eliminating the need for intermediate patch panels. DAC are flexible enough for vertical cabling management within the rack architecture. The only cabling outside the rack is the ToR switch uplink connection to the aggregation layer, making moving racks easy.

DAC for Top-of-Rack (ToR) switches application

On the market, there are many 10 Gigabit SFP+ network adapters available. Customers require flexible and scalable network adapters to meet the rigorous requirements of running mission-critical applications in virtualized and unified storage environments. Among Intel X520 adapters seem very popular. Do you use Intel X520 adapters for your servers? Can’t find right and cheap SFP+ DAC cables for the Intel X520? This blog will give the solution.

Intel X520 adapters are provided with 4 models: X520-DA2, X520-SR1, X520-SR2 and X520-LR1. X520-SR1 is shipped with 1 SR SFP+ Optic and X520-SR2 is shipped with 2 SR SFP+ Optics. X520-LR1 is shipped with 1 LR SFP+ Optic. Among X520-DA2 has dual SFP+ ports and has no SFP+ optics shipped, which is the most suitable one for direct attach copper cables and the most popular one on the market.

X520-DA2 X520-SR1 X520-SR2 X520-LR1
Dual-port DAC Single-port SR fiber Dual-port SR fiber Single-port LR fiber
X520-DA2 X520-SR1 X520-SR2 X520-LR1

By checking up the Intel X520 adapters data sheet, SFP+ DAC twinaxial cables and SFP+ optics that can be used with X520 adapters are as the following.

Part Name Intel Product Code FS.COM Supply
1m SFP+ DAC XDACBL1M $11.00 for same-day shipping
3m SFP+ DAC XDACBL3M $15.00 for same-day shipping
5m SFP+ DAC XDACBL5M $24.00 for same-day shipping
SR SFP+ Optic E10GSFPSR $16.00 for same-day shipping
LR SFP+ Optic E10GSFPLR $34.00 for same-day shipping

SFP+ direct attach copper twinax cables offer the smallest 10G form factor and a small overall cable diameter for higher density and optimized rack space in 10G uplinks and are ideal for switch and network card connection. FS.COM provides full series of 10G SFP+ cable, which covers a wide range of applications. Both generic and brand compatible versions are available. All SFP+ cables are 100% tested to ensure the compatible and quality.

3rd Party Optical Transceivers vs OEM Switch Warranty

As we all know, 3rd party optical transceivers are much cheaper than Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) optical transceivers. Therefore, more and more companies are using and plan to use 3rd party optical transceivers in their network project. However, many original equipment manufacturer published limited warranty policy about 3rd party hardware. Then should we use 3rd party optical transceivers or not? Let’s get a look at most popular network equipment manufacturer warranty policies firstly.

3rd Party Optical Transceivers

Cisco
The Cisco guideline for support and warranty services for the use of third-party memory, cables, gigabit interface controllers (GBICs), filters, or other non-Cisco components is as follows:

When a customer reports a product fault or defect and Cisco believes the fault or defect can be traced to the use of third-party memory products, cables, GBIC’s, filters, or other non-Cisco components by a customer or reseller, then, at Cisco’s discretion, Cisco may withhold support under warranty or a Cisco support program such as SMARTnet™ service.
When a product fault or defect occurs in the network, and Cisco concludes that the fault or defect is not attributable to the use of third-party memory, cables, GBICs, filters, or other non-Cisco components installed by a customer or reseller, Cisco will continue to provide support for the affected product under warranty or covered by a Cisco support program.

Juniper
Juniper Networks is not obligated to provide services for any of the following:

Third-party devices (hardware, software, cabling, etc.) not provided by Juniper Networks, or problems associated with or arising directly or indirectly from such components. Problems with product that have been installed by any party other than (A) Juniper Networks or (B) a party authorized by Juniper Networks.

Brocade

In order to ensure proper operation of Brocade products, it is required that all Brocade systems utilize only Brocade supplied optical transceiver components. Brocade reserves the right to void warranty and service support offerings if optical transceiver components other than those supplied by Brocade are used in the operation of Brocade products.

HP

This HP Limited Warranty does not apply to expendable or consumable parts, with the exception of HP printing supplies and certain rechargeable batteries as specified below, and does not extend to any HP Hardware Product from which the serial number has been removed or that has been damaged or rendered defective by software, interfacing, parts or supplies not supplied by HP; HP is not responsible for any interoperability or compatibility issues that may arise when products, software, or options not supported by HP are used; If HP equipment is got defective because of using 3rd party hardware, then HP Limited Warranty does not apply.

Dell

What is covered by this limited hardware warranty? – This limited hardware warranty covers defects in materials and workmanship in your Dell-branded hardware products, including Dell-branded peripheral products.

What is not covered by this limited hardware warranty? – Using accessories, parts or components not supplied by Dell & Commercial hardware products that use, or in which have been installed, products or components that have not been provided by Dell.

How long does this limited hardware warranty last? This limited hardware warranty may be voided by Dell, at Dell’s sole discretion, if third party products that were not provided by Dell are installed on your Dell system.

Conclusion
Comparing some of the biggest network equipment vendor warranty policies we see that most of them have similar rules on using 3rd party optical transceivers. If problems are caused by 3rd party optical transceivers, then warranty support will be refused until optical transceivers are changed to OEM ones. In the mean while if defect to vendor’s equipment is caused by 3rd party optical transceiver (and it is proved by vendor) then warranty can also be voided. So, this leads to biggest question – Does 3rd party transceivers ensures the same working and quality standards as OEM optical transceivers?

The answer is yes! Because 3rd party optical transceivers are manufactured and assembled in the same factories where OEM branded ones are. Optical transceivers are standardized by SFP Multi source agreement. This means everyone can manufacture and supply optical transceivers. As a result there is absolutely no difference in hardware for official branded transceiver and reliable 3rd party optical transceiver, as much as four or ten times cost difference. The performance is the same because all manufacturers follow same rules same standards.

If there is no real difference between OEM optical transceivers and 3rd party transceivers, then why network equipment vendors has such strict warranty policies? That is because network equipment manufacturers has to make money. They will use all available resources to sell more of their production. So they make warranty policies which psychologically affects their customers, making them think that there will problems (warranty void) if they will use other vendor equipment’s (transceivers) in their OEM devices.

As the leading global manufacturer and supplier of compatible optical transceiver modules, Fiberstore (FS.COM) always specialized in compatibility breakthrough and insisted on the high performance of the optical components. Most of the common used transceivers which are designed to be compatible with many major brands are in stock and with very competitive prices for your options.

How to Build a Home Network?

You may want to connect your desktops, laptops, printers and other machines at your home to the internet and achieve the information sharing. Perhaps you just want to connect your smart phone via WiFi when you’re at home to reduce the usage of your mobile data plan. To complete that, all you need to know is how to build a home network. There are lots of ways to set one up. I’ll introduce the basic setup for the most common case. For person that already have a network, I’II tell ways about how to expand the existing home network in this blog too.

Basic Wired Ethernet Connection

The basis of your home network will be Ethernet. This word has a very specific technical meaning, but in common use, it’s simply the technology behind 99% of computer networks. Most computers now come already equipped with an Ethernet adapter – it’s the squarish hole that accepts Ethernet cables.

ethernet-laptop

Usually, your broadband connection being cable, DSL, or something else will first go through some kind of device typically called a modem. The modem’s job is to convert the broadband signal to Ethernet. You’ll connect that Ethernet from your broadband modem to a broadband router. Router, as its name implies, is used to “route” information between computers on your home network and between those computers and the broadband connection to the Internet. Each of your computers already has an Ethernet adapter. An Ethernet cable will run from each computer to the router and another cable will connect the router to the modem.

Wired Ethernet Connections

Set up Wireless Connection

Most laptops and portable devices (and even a few desktops) support wireless connection via a technology known as WiFi. WiFi is a short-range wireless technology that you need to provide on your home network, if you want to be able to use it. The most common approach to include wireless capabilities in your network is by using a wireless router.

Wireless Connections

The wireless router combines the functions of two devices: the router, just as we saw before, and a wireless access point. A wireless access point, occasionally abbreviated WAP, is simply a network device that converts the wired Ethernet signals into wireless WiFi signals and vice-versa. Wireless routers are actually more common than their wired-only counterparts in the home and small business networking market. In fact, even if you don’t have a wireless device today, I typically recommend getting a wireless router anyway for future expansion.

Expand the Home Network Capacity

The number of internet-connected devices that we now deal with is pretty amazing. A typical wireless router or router with a wireless access point can easily handle dozens of devices connected wirelessly. However, wired devices may present problems. Many home routers – wired or wireless – come with only a limited number of connections. It’s common for there to be exactly five connections: one for the internet (“WAN” or modem) and then four for networked devices.

router-connect

If all you have is a four-port router, adding that fifth device looks like a problem. The simple solution is to use a switch. A switch is a semi-intelligent network extender. Its job is simply to make sure that data coming in on any port is sent to the other correct port to reach its intended destination. That’s really all it is. All ports on a switch are equal. In the example below, one port of the switch is connected to one of the ports on the router to which a computer might have been connected. Other computers are then connected to the switch. Switches come in many sizes and often add much more than just a few ports. Common configurations for the home include 8 or 16-port switches.

Expand Home Networks

Conclusion

Build a home network is very easy. Usually, the modem is provided by ISP. All you need to buy is the router and some Ethernet cables. FS.COM provides cat5e, cat6 and cat6a Ethernet cables with many color and length options. Snagless boot design prevents unwanted cable snags during installation and provides extra strain relief. Besides, custom service is also available. For more details, welcome to visit www.fs.com or contact us over sales@fs.com.

Source:http://www.fs.com/blog/how-to-build-a-home-network.html

Dell 100GbE Switches: S6100-ON vs Z9100-ON

Whether you recognize it or not, 100GbE is right here, right now. As the industry’s first multi-rate 100GbE 1U switch, Dell’s Z9100-ON sets a high standard for the competition to follow. Soon afterwards Dell launched 2U 100GbE switches S6100-ON. These two Dell 100GbE switches support for a wide range of port speeds allows early adopters to move to 25GbE now and upgrade to 40GbE, 50GbE or 100GbE when the price is right. Which one did you deploy now? And why did you make the choice?

Dell Z9100-ON 100GbE Switches
The Dell Networking Z9100-ON is a 100GbE top-of rack (ToR) fixed switch purpose-built for applications in high-performance data center and computing environments. Z9100-ON 100GbE switch has 32 fixed 100GbE QSFP28 ports and a couple of 10GbE SFP+ ports to one side. This also allows for up to 64 ports of 50GbE, 32 ports of 40GbE, 128 ports of 25GbE or 128+2 ports of 10GbE switching all within the same module. Dell has thoughtfully provided these to allow you to connect legacy servers or switches without wasting a 100GbE port.

Dell 100GbE Switch Z9100-ON
Dell S6100-ON 100GbE Switches
Dell Networking S6100-ON Multi-rate Fabric Switch is a customizable fixed form factor 100GbE switch with 4 bays and 3 unique modules. It allows customers to mix and match modules delivering greater flexibility and choice than anything on the market today for this technology.
1) 16 ports of 40GbE. With 4 of these modules, customers can have up to 64ports of 40GbE in just 2RU!
2) 8 ports of QSFP28. This allows for up to 8 ports of 100GbE, 16 ports of 40 or 50GbE, or 32 ports of 10 or 25GbE switching all within the same module.
3) 4 ports of QSFP28 and 4 ports of CXP. The CXP ports allow for interconnects with legacy 100GbE in customer’s existing data centers as well as 4 ports of the newer/lower cost QSFP28.

Dell 100GbE Switch S6100-ON

S6100-ON vs Z9100-ON
If you want to build 100G network, both S6100-ON and Z9100-ON 100GbE switches can meet your requirement. Z9100-ON has fixed 100G QSFP28 ports and 10G SFP+ ports, and S6100-ON has fixed 100G QSFP28 ports, 100G CXP ports and 40G QSFP28 ports. Therefore, compared to Z9100-ON 100GbE switch, S6100-ON seems has more flexibility. And the S6100-ON price is higher than Z9100-ON. You can choose the right one for your specific requirements. To better power up your Dell S6100-ON or Z9100-ON 100GbE switches, you may need some good quality but cost-effectiive 100G optics and cables. FS.COM (Fiberstore) provides Dell QSFP28-100G-SR4 transceivers at 400 dollars and QSFP-100G-CWDM4 transceivers at 1350 dollars. And all these two transceiver modules are in stock now for same-day shipping. Besides the optics, Dell 100GbE QSFP28 to QSFP28 cables and 4x25GbE QSFP28 to SFP28 cables are also offered in Fiberstore for your option.

Still Confused about CVR-X2-SFP10G Compatibility?

The Cisco OneX Converter Module (model CVR-X2-SFP10G), also known as a converter module, is a hot-swappable input/output (I/O) device that slides into a 10-Gigabit Ethernet X2 slot on a switch. It converts the 10-Gigabit X2 interface into a single 10-Gigabit SFP+ interface. It is supported on many platforms using X2 interfaces. Which platforms are they? In fact, many people are confused about the CVR-X2-SFP10G compatibility. In this blog, I will give some knowledge about the compatibility for Cisco OneX CVR-X2-SFP10G Converter Module.

Cisco OneX CVR-X2-SFP10G Converter Module

CVR-X2-SFP10G Supported SFP+ Modules and Patch Cords
Not all SFP+ modules can be used for Cisco CVR-X2-SFP10G OneX converter module. Table below lists the SFP+ modules and twinax cables that available.

SFP+ Module Number Description
SFP-10G-SR Cisco 10GBASE-SR SFP-Plus transceiver module for MMF, 850-nm wavelength
SFP-H10GB-CU1M Twinax cable assembly, 1m, 30 AWG
SFP-H10GB-CU3M Twinax cable assembly, 3m, 30 AWG
SFP-H10GB-CU5M Twinax cable assembly, 5m, 24 AWG

Table below lists the fiber-optic cabling specifications for the SFP+ modules that you install in the converter module. Each port must match the wavelength specifications on the other end of the cable, and the cable must not exceed the stipulated cable length. The SFP modules using fiber-optic connections need fiber-optic cables with LC/PC or LC/UPC connectors.

SFP Module Wavelength Fiber Type Core Size (micron) Modal Bandwidth (MHz/km) Cable Distance
10GBASE-SR 850 MMF 62.5

62.5

50

50

50

160

200

400

500

2000

85 feet (26 m)

108 feet (33 m)

216 feet (66 m)

269 feet (82 m)

984 feet (300 m)

CVR-X2-SFP10G Supported Switch Series and Models
There are many switches that have X2 ports, but not all can be supported for CVR-X2-SFP10G OneX converter module. According to Cisco 10-Gigabit Ethernet Transceiver Modules Compatibility Matrix, the CVR-X2-SFP10G is supported on Catalyst 3100 Blade Switches, Nexus 7000 Series Switches, Catalyst 3560-E Series Switches, Catalyst 3750-E Series Switches, Catalyst 4500 Series Switches, Catalyst 4900 Series Switches,Cisco ME 4900 Series Switches, Catalyst 6500 Series Switches.

Switch Series Model
Catalyst 3100 Blade Switches WS-CBS3110X-S-I, WS-CBS3120X-S, WS-CBS3130X-S
Nexus 7000 Series N7K-M108X2-12L
Catalyst 3560-E Series WS-C3560E-24TD, WS-C3560E-24PD , WS-C3560E-48TD, WS-C3560E-48PD, WS-C3560E-48PDF, WS-C3560E-12D,WS-C3560E-12SD
Catalyst 3750-E Series WS-C3750E-24TD, WS-C3750E-24PD, WS-C3750E-48TD, WS-C3750E-48PD,WS-C3750E-48PDF
Catalyst 4500 Series WS-X4516-10GE,WS-X4013+10GE, WS-X45-SUP6-E, WS-X4606-X2-E,WS-X45-SUP6L-E
Catalyst 4900 Series WS-C4948-10GE,WS-C4928-10GE,WS-C4900M,WS-X4904-10GE,WS-X4908-10GE
ME 4900 Series ME-4924-10GE
Catalyst 6500 Series VS-S720-10G-3C,VS-S720-10G-3CXL,WS-X6708-10G-3C,WS-X6708-10G-3CXL,WS-X6716-10G-3C,WS-X6716-10G-3CXL,VS-S2T-10G,VS-S2T-10G-XL,WS-X6816-10G-2T,WS-X6816-10G-2TXL, WS-X6908-10G-2T,WS-X6908-10G-2TXL

Backbone Cabling vs Horizontal Cabling

Computer networks require complicated and specific cabling, particularly in business or academic settings. The cables used in cabling the networks must be made from certain materials. Backbone cabling and horizontal cabling are two main cabling methods used in today’s structured cabling system and neither is dispensable. In order to meet different connection needs, cables used in backbone cabling and horizontal cabling also have many differences from each other. So what’s the difference between them?Knowledge of backbone cabling and horizontal cabling will be introduced in this article.

Structured Cabling System Basics
To understand backbone cabling and horizontal cabling, let’s understand the six subsystems of structured cabling firstly. These six subsystems are often found throughout a building and are connected together so that various types of data can be transmitted consistently and securely (shown in the figure below).

Structured Cabling System

  • Entrance Facility: This room is where both public and private network service cables communicate with the outside world.
  • Equipment Room:  A room with equipment that serves the users inside the building.
  • Telecommunications Room: This room contains the telecommunications equipment that connects the backbone and horizontal cabling subsystems.
  • Backbone Cabling: A system of cabling that connects the entrance facilities, equipment rooms and telecommunications rooms.
  • Horizontal Cabling: The system of cabling that connects telecommunications rooms to individual outlets or work areas on the floor.
  • Work Area Components: These connect end-user equipment to outlets of the horizontal cabling system.

 

Backbone Cabling
The backbone cabling is also called vertical cabling or wiring. It provides interconnection between telecommunication rooms, equipment rooms and entrance facilities. These backbone cablings typically are done from floor to floor to floor. When setting up backbone cabling, several types of media can be used: unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable, shielded twisted-pair (STP) cable, fiber optic cable, or coaxial cable. Equipment should be connected by cables of no more than 30 meters (98 feet).

Backbone Cabling

With the emerge of Gigabit Ethernet and 10 Gigabit Ethernet, fiber optic cable is the most appropriate choice for backbone cabling since they provide much higher bandwidth than traditional Cat5, Cat6 or even Cat7 twisted pair copper cables. Another advantage of fiber is that fibers can run much longer distance than copper cable, which makes them especially attractive for backbone cabling.

Horizontal Cabling
The horizontal cabling system extends from the work area’s telecommunications information outlet to the telecommunications room (TR) or telecommunications enclosure (TE). As shown in the figure below, horizontal cabling is usually installed in a star topology that connects each work area to the telecommunications room. It includes the telecommunications outlet, an optional consolidation point, horizontal cable, mechanical terminations and patch cords (or jumpers) located in the TR or TE.

Horizontal Cabling

Four-pair 100-ohm unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cabling (Cat5 or Cat5e cabling) is usually recommended for new installations because it supports both voice and high-speed data transmission. To comply with EIA/TIA wiring standards, individual cables should be limited to 90 meters in length between the outlet in the work area and the patch panels in the telecommunications room. Patch cords for connecting the patch panel to hubs and switches in the telecommunications room should be no longer than 6 meters total distance. Cables connecting users’ computers to outlets should be limited to 3 meters in length.

Backbone Cabling  vs Horizontal Cabling
Although the same types of cables are used for both backbone and horizontal cabling, since backbone cabling typically passes through from floor to floor, the cables used for backbone cabling have very different requirement from the horizontal cablings. Backbone cables must meet particular fire-rating specifications, typically OFNR (Optical Fiber Non-Conductive Riser) rated. If the backbone cable passes through plenum area (spaces in the building used for air return in air conditioning), the cable must be OFNP (Optical Fiber Non-conductive Plenum) rated. Besides, since backbone cables need to have enough strength to support its own weight, cable strength for backbone cables is also different from horizontal cables. And unlike horizontal cables, backbone cables must be secured correctly.

Conclusion
As two important parts of structured cabling, both backbone cabling and horizontal cabling play an irreplaceable role. And due to the different cabling environment, backbone cables and horizontal cables may have different specifications. FS.COM provides both Cat5, Cat6 or Cat7 UTP or STP copper cables and OFNR or OFNP multimode or single-mode fiber patch cables for backbone cabling and horizontal cabling. For more information about the backbone cabling and horizontal cabling solutions or other cabling solutions, please contact us via sales@fs.com.

Source:http://www.fs.com/blog/