Tag Archives: 10 gigabit switch

PPPoE vs DHCP: What is the difference?

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PPPoE vs DHCP may sound like two irrelevant items since the application of each are not the same: DHCP is a protocol for obtaining IP addresses while PPPoE is a common method of connecting to an ISP. But the debate over PPPoE vs DHCP differences has been around for a long time and thus causes a lot confusions. So in this article we will have PPPoE vs DHCP explained and walk you through how they differ from each other.

PPPoE vs DHCP: DHCP Wiki

DHCP, or Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, is a standardized client/server network protocol that dynamically assigns IP addresses and other related configuration information to network devices. It is known that each device from a TCP/IP network should have a unique IP address to access the network. So without DHCP configuration, network admins have to configure IP addresses manually if they want to add new computers or move computers from one subnet to another. Usually, a DHCP architecture is made up of DHCP clients, DHCP servers and DHCP relay agents.

dhcp wiki

DHCP works to offer an automated way to distribute and update IP addresses and other configuration information on a network. A DHCP server provides this information to a DHCP client through the exchange of a series of messages. DHCP enables network users to travel anywhere on the network and automatically receive an IP address when they reconnecting. On the other hand, DHCP provides network admins quicker and more reliable IP address configuration – it mitigates configuration errors caused by manual IP address configuration. DHCP also helps to conserve limited IP address space.

PPPoE vs DHCP: What Is PPPoE?

PPPoE, short for Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet, is an Ethernet encapsulation of the Point to Point Protocol that is commonly used with dial-up connections. This allows the modem to be a part of the network that multiple users can utilize instead of being connected directly to the computer. PPPoE combines the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), commonly used in dialup connections, with the Ethernet protocol, which supports multiple users in a local area network. The PPP protocol information is encapsulated within an Ethernet frame. To employ PPPoE, you need a username and a password provided by your ISP, which you use to dial-up to your ISP and establish a connection. More recent modems now incorporate the PPPoE dialer into them. You can simply set your username and password once and your modem automatically connects to the internet whenever you turn it on.

what is pppoe

PPPoE vs DHCP: How They Differ?

DHCP is a way for a network to allocate unique IP addresses to the devices (i.e. computers, smartphones Gigabit Ethernet switch and etc.) within a network, so that traffic can be delivered back-n-forth without confusion. PPPoE is a way to encapsulate network traffic, based on credentialed access (i.e. username/password). PPPoE needs to be configured correctly before a user can actually connect to the internet, however, modems that use DHCP does not need to be configured and is basically plug and play. So using DHCP to connect to an ISP eliminates the problems that are associated with PPPOE. Just like with computers on a network, you do not need to configure your computer beforehand. You simply leave everything on automatic and leave the configuration to the ISP servers.

The difference between PPPoE vs DHCP can be summarized as following:

  • DHCP is a protocol for obtaining IP addresses while PPPOE is a common method of connecting to an ISP
  • DHCP is very popular and is widely used while PPPOE is slowly falling out of favor
  • You would need to have a username and password with PPPOE while the configuration of DHCP is automatic

Conclusion

So we’ve explored the definition of each term and major PPPoE vs DHCP differences. It is thus to conclude that there is no “one is better than the other”- PPPoE and DHCP serve two entirely different purpose without overlap. Hope it would help to clear out your confusion. Backed by a professional tech team, FS.COM has improved solutions for network devices like Ethernet routers, fiber switch (i.e. 10 Gigabit switch) and servers. To get any further information, reach us via sales@fs.com.

What Is Link Aggregation and Link Aggregation Switch?

1GbE network is ubiquitous at the edge of network, but it is reaching the limits as the demand for bandwidth continue to soar. Since 10 Gigabit network is still out of reach for most homes and small businesses, it is possible to upgrade to 10GbE without piling up the cost? You can surely make it by implementing link aggregation and link aggregation switch. We’re going to share some insights on deploying link aggregation with Ethernet switch.

what is link aggregation

What Is Link Aggregation and Link Aggregation Switch

Link aggregation allows one to combine multiple network connections in parallel to increase throughput, and to provide redundancy in case one link goes down. Besides, link aggregation load balance enables the processing and communications activity to be distributed across several links in a trunk, thus not overwhelming a single link. Moreover, improvements within the link are obtained using existing hardware, so you don’t have to upgrade to higher-capacity link. To configure link aggregation, we need to apply a standard, vendor-independent link aggregation protocol that supported by IEEE 802.3ad – LACP (link aggregation control protocol).

configure link aggregation switch

Link aggregation technology can be used for core switching equipment such as link aggregation switch. Link aggregation switch, or LACP switch, is to set up or configure switch to achieve this technology. Link aggregation switch can be Gigabit Ethernet switch or 10 Gigabit switch that supported LACP.

What Are the Benefits of Link Aggregation Switch?

Before reaping the benefits of link aggregation switch, check to see if your devices can fulfill the following prerequisites.

Generally, all of the aggregated links must:

  • be in full duplex mode
  • use the same data transmission rates (at least 1 Gbit/s)
  • use parallel point-to-point connections
  • connect to precisely one endpoint on a switch or server. Link aggregation using multiple switches to one link-aggregated endpoint.

If all the above requests are fulfilled, then you would get these benefits after setting up link aggregation.

  • Increased reliability and availability. If one of the physical links in the link aggregation group (LAG) goes down, traffic is dynamically and transparently reassigned to one of the other physical links.
  • Better use of physical resources. Traffic can be load-balanced across the physical links.
  • Increased bandwidth. The aggregated physical links deliver higher bandwidth than each individual link.
  • Cost effectiveness. A physical network upgrade can be expensive, especially if it requires new cable runs. Link aggregation increases bandwidth without requiring new equipment.

How to Configure Link Aggregation Switch?

Here is a step-by-step guide for setting up link aggregation between link aggregation switches in your network. Before getting started, confirm the following aspects:

Make sure that both devices support link aggregation.

1. Configure the LAG on each of the two devices.

2. Make sure that the LAG that you create on each device has the same settings for port speed, duplex mode, flow control, and MTU size (on some devices, this setting might be called jumbo frames).

3. Make sure that all ports in a LAG have the same virtual local area network (VLAN) memberships.

4. If you want to add a LAG to a VLAN, set up the LAG first and then add the LAG to the VLAN; do not add individual ports.

5. Note which ports on each device you add to the LAG, and make sure that you connect the correct ones.

6. Use Ethernet or fiber cable to connect the ports that you added to the LAG on each device.

7. Verify that the port LED for each connected port on each switch is blinking green.

8. Verify in the admin interface for each device that the link is UP.

The video below illustrates the procedures to set up LACP between a Cisco switch and FS network switch.

Conclusion

Link aggregation is the efforts made to set up parallel network structures to provide redundancy, or to improve performance, increases bandwidth and provides graceful degradation as failure occurs. Configure link aggregation switch can be made easier if you properly perform the above instructions. FS.COM is committed to research and develop data switch and Gigabit PoE switch solutions for SMBs, enterprise networks and data centers. For more details, feel free to contact us via sales@fs.com.

Related Article: LACP vs PAGP: What’s the Difference?




How to Deploy 48 Port 10GE Switch in Data Center?

10 Gigabit network becomes popular as the business is growing, which enhance the deployment of 10G copper or SFP+ switches in data centers. With the rapid evolvement of IoT (Internet of things), cloud computing and other media-rich applications such as Skype, Amazon video, Snapchat and Youtube, the shift from 10G network to 40G has become the new trend. In this process, 10GbE switch with 40G QSFP+ uplink port makes a difference. In this post, the applications of 48 port 10GE switch for data center design will be explored.

Overview on Popular 48 Port 10GE Switch

10GE switch provides high-density 10GE access to help enterprises and carriers build a scalable data center network platform in the cloud computing era. When it comes to 48 port 10GE network switches, Cisco 10GE SFP+ switches maybe the first choice that many users prefer. However, not all network vendors will choose Cisco switches due to their high price. And there are various types of 10 Gigabit switch in the market for network designers to choose from. The table below shows the main details of several 48 port 10GE switches that can be used as ToR or leaf switches in data centers. Network designers can take it as a reference when choosing 10GbE SFP switch.

10GE Switch Mode Port Switching Capacity Forwarding Rate Typical/Max. Power Price
Cisco Nexus 3172PQ 48 SFP+ Port & 6 QSFP+ Port 1.4Tbps 1 bpps 206W/293W $14339
Arista 7050SX-72Q 48 SFP+ Port & 6 QSFP+ Port 1.44Tbps 1080Mpps 127W/251W $21,295
Dell S4810 48 SFP+ Port & 6 QSFP+ Port 1.28Tbps 960Mpps 220W/350W $11334
Huawei CE6851-48S6Q-HI 48 SFP+ Port & 4 QSFP+ Port 1.44Tbps 1080Mpps 216W/245W $6,783
FS.COM
S5850-48S6Q
48 SFP+ Port & 6 QSFP+ Port 1.44Tbps 1070Mpps 150W/190W $3,999

Deploy 48 Port 10GE ToR/Leaf 10GE Switch in Different Size Network Applications

To illustrate how to design the 48 port 10GE switch in practical applications, here take FS.COM S5850-48S6Q ToR/Leaf 10GE switch as an example.

Data Center Applications

48 port 10GE switches are often used as leaf switches in large data center design. In today’s data center, leaf-spine topology and ToR design are the commonly used architectures. And ToR switches are used as leaf switches and they are connected to the spine switches. Just as the following picture shows, FS.COM S5850-48S6Q 10GE switches work as ToR switches and connected to the spine switches (FS.COM 100G switches) using the 40G/10G port.

48-port 10ge switches

Campus network Applications

Of course, 48 port 10GE switch also can act as aggregation or core switches for enterprise campus networks. In the following application diagram, FS.COM S5850-48S6Q 10GE switches work as aggregation switches and connected to 40G core switches and gigabit switch.

48 port 10ge aggregation switches

Scaling Network with 40G Uplink Port on 48 Port 10GE Switch

For a spine-leaf network, usually the uplinks from leaf to spine are 10G or 40G, and they can migrate over time from a starting point of 10G (Nx10G) to 40G (or Nx40G). The 48 port 10GE ToR network switch listed above offer this flexibility, because the 40G QSFP+ uplink port can be configured as either 1x40G or 4x10G and using optics breakout to individual 10G links, allowing many designs easily evolve from 10G uplinks to 40G uplinks or support a combination.

FS.COM S5850-48S6Q 48-port 10GE switch

Summary

The next generation data center network will continue to evolve rapidly over the few years. While with both 10G SFP+ port and 40G QSFP+ uplink port, this cheap 10GbE switch provides cost-effective and high-density data center and campus network solutions, and can meet the ever-increasing demand for network bandwidth at the same time.

Related article: Can We Use Third-party Optical Transceiver Modules for Dell Switches?


Comparison Between 10Gb Switch Under $550

Industrial Ethernet has fast become the network of choice for the interconnection of data center devices, due to its incredible speed, bandwidth and flexibility. The market for network switch is booming as vendors compete to develop items with advanced features and functions. This, however, makes the simple choice of an Ethernet switch overly complex. 10Gb switch is often used as access or leaf switch (depending on your network architecture) in data centers, the importance of which cannot be underestimate. This article will compare some cost-effective 10 Gigabit switches on the market, each of them costs less than $550.

Options of 10Gb Switch Under $550

In this section, we will take a brief review of some 10Gb switches that cost less than $550. The following is a 10GB network switch comparison.

MikroTik CRS226-24G-2S+IN

This switch combines the features of a fully functional router and a Layer 3 10Gb switch. It enables ports to be removed from the switch configuration, and used for routing purposes. The CRS226 has 24 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports and two SFP+ ports for 10G connectivity.

MikroTik CRS226-24G-2S+RM

CRS226-24G-2S+RM is a fully functional Layer 3 10Gb switch. It has 24 Gigabit ports and two SFP+ cages for 10G connectivity (first SFP port supports 1.25G/10G modules, second port only 10G modules).

MikroTik CRS210-8G-2S+IN

Featuring small size and low cost, this fully functional router and a Layer 3 10Gb switch comes with 8 Gigabit Ethernet ports and two SFP+ cages for 10G connectivity (first port supports 1.25G/10G modules, second port only 10G modules).

D-Link DGS-1510-28X

The DGS-1510-28X is a smart managed 10Gb switch that contains 24 10/100/1000 Mbps ports plus 4 10G SFP+ ports. It is ideal for deployments in the SME/SMB core with its 10G uplinks connecting with servers equipped with 10G port connectivity. For medium to large scale enterprise deployment, it can serve as a good interconnection between the core switch and edge switch.

D-Link DGS-1510-20

The DGS-1510-20 contains 16 10/100/1000 Mbps ports, 2 Gigabit SFP ports and 2 10G SFP+ ports. It belongs to D-link DGS-1510 series like DGS-1510-28X, providing a reliable, scalable, and modular interconnection with rich capabilities and simplified flexibility.

Ubiquiti ES-48-Lite EdgeSwitch

Ubiquiti ES-40-Lite is a fully managed 10Gb switch that delivers robust performance and intelligent switching for growing networks. It offers both Layer 2 switching features and Layer 3 routing capability, supporting 48 10/100/1000 Mbps RJ45 Ethernet ports, 2 1/10 Gbps SFP+ Ethernet ports and 1 Gbps SFP Ethernet ports.

ZyXEL XGS1910-24

The ZyXEL XGS1910-24 is a smart 10Gb switch built to fulfill increasing network demands for small and medium businesses (SMB). With 20 10/100/1000 ports , 4 combo Gigabit SFP ports and 2 x 10 Gigabit SFP+ ports, it allows SMBs to deliver higher bandwidth for congestion relief and smooth data delivery.

FS S3800-24T4S Switch

S3800-24T4S is a high performance metro 10Gb switch designed to meet the demand of Gigabit access and aggregation in enterprise networks. Loaded with 24 10/100/1000Base-T ports and 4 10GE SFP+ ports, it supports flexible port combination to facilitate user operations.

FS S3800-24T4S Switch 10Gb switch

10Gb Switch: How to Make the Final Decision?

Besides the cost, there are still a variety of factors to weigh when choosing a 10Gb network switch, such as: port configuration, switching capacity, power consumption and switch class. To make it simple, we use the chart below to further illustrate it.

Switch Price Switching Capacity Power Consumption 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports Gigabit SFP SFP+ ports Layer Supported
MikroTik CRS226-24G-2S+IN $289.00 88 Gbps 21W 24 / 2 Layer 3
MikroTik CRS226-24G-2S+RM $299.00 88 Gbps 21W 24 / 2 Layer 3
MikroTik CRS210-8G-2S+IN $229.00 56 Gbps 13W 8 / 2 Layer 3
D-Link DGS-1510-28X $394.99 128 Gbps 22.3 W 24 / 4 Layer 2/3
D-Link DGS-1510-20 $292.88 76 Gbps 20.3 W 16 2 2 Layer 2/3
Ubiquiti ES-48-Lite $374.55 140 Gbps 56W 48 2 2 Layer 2
ZyXEL XGS1910-24 $544.50 88 Gbps 32 Watt 20 4 combo 2 Layer 2
FS S3800-24T4S $399.00 128Gbps ≤40W 24 / 4 Layer 2+

We can conclude from the chart that, apart from the price. The port configuration and speed also matters when purchasing a 10gb switch. This two factors determine the switching capacity. So you have to consider the amount of traffic to run through the 10Gb switch and select one that can accommodate all the dataflow. Power consumption is also a very important aspect as it defines the operating cost in the long run. Think about tens of thousands of network switch in a middle sized data center, a power efficiency switch can save you a great amount of money.

Conclusion

10Gb switch is the most effective solution for labs or small deployments. This article compares only a fraction of the important parameters of these 10Gb Ethernet switches. Once you have gone through all this factors, choice can thus be make based on your specific condition. Are there any other factors your organization considers when preparing to buy a switch 10Gb? What do you think are the most important factors? Post your comments below.

Related Article: 10G ToR/Leaf Ethernet Switch: What Is the Right Choice?