Can I Use the QSFP+ Optics on QSFP28 Port?

FacebookTwitterGoogle+LinkedInRedditTumblrShare

100G Ethernet will have a larger share of network equipment market in 2017, according to Infonetics Research. But we can’t neglect the fact that 100G technology and relevant optics are still under development. Users who plan to layout 100G network for long-hual infrastructures usually met some problems. For example, currently, the qsfp28 optics on the market can only support up to 10 km (QSFP28 100GBASE-LR4) with WDM technology, which means you have to buy the extra expensive WDM devices. For applications beyond 10km, QSFP28 optical transceivers cannot reach it. Therefore, users have to use 40G QSFP+ optics on 100G switches. But here comes a problem, can I use the QSFP+ optics on the QSFP28 port of the 100G switch? If this is okay, can I use the QSFP28 modules on the QSFP+ port? This article discusses the feasibility of this solution and provides a foundational guidance of how to configure the 100G switches.

For Most Switches, QSFP+ Can Be Used on QSFP28 Port

As we all know that QSFP28 transceivers have the same form factor as the QSFP optical transceiver. The former has just 4 electrical lanes that can be used as a 4x10GbE, 4x25GbE, while the latter supports 40G ( 4x10G). So from all of this information, a QSFP28 module breaks out into either 4x25G or 4x10G lanes, which depends on the transceiver used. This is the same case with the SFP28 transceivers that accept SFP+ transceivers and run at the lower 10G speed.

QSFP can work on the QSFP28 ports

A 100G QSFP28 port can generally take either a QSFP+ or QSFP28 optics. If the QSFP28 optics support 25G lanes, then it can operate 4x25G breakout, 2x50G breakout or 1x100G (no breakout). The QSFP+ optic supports 10G lanes, so it can run 4x10GE or 1x40GE. If you use the QSFP transceivers in QSFP28 port, keep in mind that you have both single-mode and multimode (SR/LR) optical transceivers and twinax/AOC options that are available.

In all Cases, QSFP28 Optics Cannot Be Used on QSFP+ Port

SFP+ can’t auto-negotiate to support SFP module, similarly QSFP28 modules can not be used on the QSFP port, either. There is the rule about mixing optical transceivers with different speed—it basically comes down to the optic and the port, vice versa. Both ends of the two modules have to match and form factor needs to match as well. Additionally, port speed needs to be equal or greater than the optic used.

How to Configure 100G Switch?

For those who are not familiar with how to do the port configuration, you can have a look at the following part.

  • How do you change 100G QSFP ports to support QSFP+ 40GbE transceivers?

Configure the desired speed as 40G:
(config)# interface Ethernet1/1
(config-if-Et1/1)# speed forced 40gfull

  • How do you change 100G QSFP ports to support 4x10GbE mode using a QSFP+ transceiver?

Configure the desired speed as 10G:
(config)# interface Ethernet1/1 – 4
(config-if-Et1/1-4)# speed forced 10000full

  • How do you change 100G QSFP ports from 100GbE mode to 4x25G mode?

Configure the desired speed as 25G:
(config)# interface Ethernet1/1 – 4
(config-if-Et1/1-4)# speed forced 25gfull

  • How do you change 100G QSFP ports back to the default mode?

Configure the port to default mode:
(config)# interface Ethernet1/1-4
(config-if-Et1/1)# no speed

Note that if you have no experience in port configuration, it is advisable for you to consult your switch vendor in advance.

Conclusion

To sum up, QSFP+ modules can be used on the QSFP28 ports, but QSFP28 transceivers cannot transmit 100Gbps on the QSFP+ port. When using the QSFP optics on the QSFP28 port, don’t forget to configure your switch (follow the above instructions). To make sure the smooth network transmission, you need to ensure the connectors on both ends are the same and no manufacturer compatibility issue exists.

The Basics of 1000BASE-SX and 1000BASE-LX SFP

Gigabit Ethernet has been regarded as a huge breakthrough of telecom industry by offering speeds of up to 100Mbps. Gigabit Ethernet is a standard for transmitting Ethernet frames at a rate of a gigabit per second. There are five physical layer standards for Gigabit Ethernet using optical fiber (1000BASE-X), twisted pair cable (1000BASE-T), or shielded balanced copper cable (1000BASE-CX). 1000BASE-LX and 1000BASE-SX SFP are two common types of optical transceiver modules in the market. Today’s topic will be a brief introduction to 1000BASE-LX and 1000BASE-SX SFP transceivers.

1000BASE in these terms refers to a Gigabit Ethernet connection that uses the unfiltered cable for transmission. “X” means 4B/5B block coding for Fast Ethernet or 8B/10B block coding for Gigabit Ethernet. “L” means long-range single- or multi-mode optical cable (100 m to 10 km). “S” means short-range multi-mode optical cable (less than 100 m).

1000BASE-SX
1000BASE-SX is a fiber optic Gigabit Ethernet standard for operation over multi-mode fiber using a 770 to 860 nanometer, near infrared (NIR) light wavelength. The standard specifies a distance capability between 220 meters and 550 meters. In practice, with good quality fiber, optics, and terminations, 1000BASE-SX will usually work over significantly longer distances. This standard is highly popular for intra-building links in large office buildings, co-location facilities and carrier neutral internet exchanges. 1000BASE-SX SFP works at 850nm wavelength and used only for the purposed of the multimode optical fiber with an LC connector. 1000BASE-SX SFP traditional 50 microns of multimode optical fiber link is 550 meters high and 62.5 micron fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) multimode optical fiber is up to 220 meters. Take EX-SFP-1GE-SX as an example, its maximum distance is 550m with DOM support. The 1000Base-SX standard supports the multimode fiber distances shown in table 1.

1000Base-SX standard

1000BASE-LX
Specified in IEEE 802.3 Clause 38, 1000BASE-LX is a type of standard for implementing Gigabit Ethernet networks. The “LX” in 1000BASE-LX stands for long wavelength, indicating that this version of Gigabit Ethernet is intended for use with long-wavelength transmissions (1270–1355 nm) over long cable runs of fiber optic cabling. 1000BASE-LX can run over both single mode fiber and multimode fiber with a distance of up to 5 km and 550 m, respectively. For link distances greater than 300 m, the use of a special launch conditioning patch cord may be required. 1000BASE-LX is intended mainly for connecting high-speed hubs, Ethernet switches, and routers together in different wiring closets or buildings using long cabling runs, and developed to support longer-length multimode building fiber backbones and single-mode campus backbones. E1MG-LX-OM is Brocade 1000BASE-LX SFP that operates over a wavelength of 1310nm for 10 km.

1000BASE-LX SFP

Difference Between LX, LH and LX/LH
Many vendors use both LH and LX/LH for certain SFP modules, this SFP type is similar with the other SFPs in basic working principle and size. However, LH and LX/LH aren’t a Gigabit Ethernet standard and are compatible with 1000BASE-LX standard. 1000BASE-LH SFP operates a distance up to 70km over single-mode fiber. For example, Cisco MGBLH1 1000BASE-LH SFP covers a link length of 40km that make itself perfect for long-reach application. 1000BASE-LX/LH SFP can operate on standard single-mode fiber-optic link spans of up to 10 km and up to 550 m on any multimode fibers. In addition, when used over legacy multimode fiber type, the transmitter should be coupled through a mode conditioning patch cable.

Conclusion
1000BASE SFP transceiver is the most commonly used component for Gigabit Ethernet application. With so many types available in the market, careful notice should be given to the range of differences, both in distance and price of multimode and single-mode fiber optics. Fiberstore offers a large amount of in-stock 1000BASE SFP transceivers which are compatible for Cisco, Juniper, Dell, Finisar, Brocade, or Netgear in various options. If you have any requirement of our products, please send your request to us.

Still Have Problems with Quanta LB4M and LB6M 10G Switches?

With the growth of virtualization, cloud-based services and applications like VoIP, video streaming and IP surveillance, various 10G switches with diverse functions spring out on the market. Quanta LB4M and LB6M 10G switches are two types popular 10G switches among them. However, there is few user manuals on the Internet, which brings inconveniences for users. This post intends to give a simple introduction to Quanta LB4M and LB6M 10G switches and some solutions for the common problems that may arise in their operating process.

Basis of Quanta LB4M and LB6M 10G Switches

The Quanta LB4M is a modular Gigabit Ethernet backbone switch designed for adaptability and scalability. This switch supports up to 48 Gigabit Ethernet ports to function as a central distribution hub for other switches, switch groups, or routers. And it offers 2 SFP+ interfaces for 10G port on the daughter board. While the Quanta LB6M switch provides 24 10GbE SFP+ ports and 4 1000BASE-T ports, which makes it more popular than LB4M. For these two switches, many users think highly of its performance. But there are also some passive remarks due to the limited documentation.

quanta lb4m & lb6m

Problem & Solution

If you have searched on the Internet, you will find that there are so many questions about Quanta LB4M and LB6M switches in all aspects like lack of instructive manuals, the operating issues, IP setup problems, etc. Here is a collection of several popular ones in discussion forums and blogs. Hope it will help you.

Quanta LB4M MAC Entry Problem

Use the LB4M in an active/passive configuration for SAN (Storage Area Networking). The two SAN nodes of the user have HA (fail over) and for that it uses a virtual IP which is moved between the two head nodes in case of failure. But the virtual IP MAC is missing from the LB4M switches “mac-addr-table”, which in turn leads to this virtual IP to be mirrored to all ports on that vlan.

Solution: right MAC (Media Access Control) mapping is the core of Ethernet switches. The first choice is to determine whether the MAC address of the switches is valid. Then pick a random address with the same 3-byte prefix as one of your physical MAC addresses and see if the switch accepts it. Another choice is to check the port security where the switch only accepts traffic from a single MAC address, either hard-coded in the config or the first one “seen” on that port.

LB4M Ports Are Deactivated and Backup Image Is Corrupt

Bought a Quanta LB4M and configured a management IP for the Web interface. After rebooting the switch as told, the screen showed that the crc-checksum for both the first and the backup image are corrupt, and another image is needed via the modem.

Solution: try to get upload an image via the modem to fix the problem. And then test it to check if the switch works.

Connect Dell 2848 with SFP to Quanta LB6M?

Dell 2848 switch has four SFP ports, while the Quanta LB6M has 24 10GbE SFP+ ports and 4 1000BASE-T ports. And other devices also need to be connected with. Then how to connect Dell 2848 with Quanta LB6M? The data center is currently running on a 1Gb Cat 6 cables.

Solution: using 10Gb SFP+ LC modules for the Quanta LB6M, 1Gb SFP LC modules for the Dell 2848 and then run MM fiber. Since SFP+ and SFP ports are not compatible, OEM services are another choice to solve this type of problem. FS.COM offers various kinds of customized service to meet customers’ different demands.

How to Avoid the Problems Mentioned Above?

It is undeniable that the Quanta LB4M and LB6M 10G switches are popular among users, which can be seen from the remarks in some forums. But since there is few instructive documents to describe these two types of switches, it will be difficult to solve the problems met in the operating process immediately. FS.COM supplies various kinds of 10G switches to meet the demand of Gigabit access or aggregation for enterprise networks and operators customers. Other 10G optics like 10G transceiver and 10G DAC & AOC are also available. Welcome to visit our website www.fs.com for more information.

How to Handle Challenges of CWDM Testing?

CWDM technology has proven itself to be a cost-effective and simplified method for network managers to optimize the existing infrastructure. The adoption of CWDM system into metro and regional network is constantly on the rise and it also extends the reach to the access networks. CWDM is becoming more widely accepted as an important transport architecture owing to its lower power dissipation, smaller size, and less cost. This article will focus on the challenges concerning CWDM testing, and provide several methods to help overcome them.

Basic Configurations of CWDM Network

CWDM configuration is usually based on a single-fiber pair: one fiber is for transmitting and the other for receiving. The following figure shows the most basic configuration of optical network with 4 channel CWDM MUX/DEMUX: it often delivers eight wavelengths, from 1471 nm to 1611 nm, with 20 nm apart. A CWDM architecture is quite simple. It only has passive components like multiplexers and demultiplexers, without any active elements such as amplifiers. However, using CWDM as a means of increasing bandwidth also brings network characterization and deployment challenges, which will be discussed in the following section.

cwdm basic configuration

Challenges and Solutions for CWDM Testing

The challenges of CWDM testing mainly lie in three phases: construction and installation, system activation and upgrade or troubleshoot. Here we provide solutions for each.

Challenge One: Construction and Installation

During construction and installation process, it is essential to conduct physical-layer tests on the fiber from the head-end to the destination. Single-ended testing with an OTDR is definitively an advantage as it optimizes labor resources. In this case, the objectives are to characterize the entire link (not only the fiber) to include the add-drop multiplexers (OADM) and to guarantee continuity up to the final destination. However, testing at standard OTDR wavelengths, such as 1310 nm and 1550 nm, cannot be done in such conditions as these wavelengths are filtered out at either OADM, never reaching the end destination. Then how to test such a link?

cwdm otdr testing

Solution: Adopting a specialized CWDM OTDR. With CWDM-tuned wavelength, the CWDM OTDR is capable of performing an end-to-end test by dropping each test wavelength at the correspondent point on the network, allowing the characterization of each part of the network directly from the head-end. Which is considered time and labor saving since one don’t have to access. It also helps to speed up the deployment process as the technician will test all drop fibers from a single location.

Challenge Two: System Activation

Since CWDM architecture is rather basic which contains no active components like amplifiers, the only things that can prevent proper transmission in a CWDM system are transmitter failure, sudden change in the loss created in an OADM or manual errors, bad connections for example. To deal with these problems, one has to look at the signal being transmitted.

Solution: A CWDM channel analyzer is ideal to handle this challenge. It works to quickly determine the presence or absence of each of the 16 wavelengths and their power levels. Many CWDM OADM have tap ports, which means that there is a port where a small portion of the signal is dropped. Taps are typically 20 dB weaker than the main signal. If these taps are not present, a CWDM analysis should be performed. It consists of unplugging the end user to use the main feed for the analysis. To be ready for all possibilities, a CWDM channel analyzer should cover a power range going as low as –40 dBm, while being able to test the entire wavelength range in the shortest time as possible.

Challenge Three: Upgrade or Troubleshoot

In the maintenance and troubleshoot phrase, when the network is live and a new wavelength is added, one should figure out two questions: is the link properly set up? And is my wavelength presents and well?

out-of-band testing of cwdm

Solution: Two approaches are available to check if a link is set up properly: a CWDM OTDR approach or an out-of-band approach. The CWDM OTDR approach is relatively simple when a new customer is added. With CWDM OTDR, one can perform CWDM testing without having to wait for the customer or to go to the cell tower sites. The wavelength can be turned on at the head-end. Which speed testing process greatly.

The OTDR and channel analyzer combo are also useful when a single customer has issues. The channel analyzer will reveal if the channel is indeed present and within power budget. If not, the CWDM OTDR can be used to test at that specific wavelength or an out-of-band 1650 nm OTDR test can be performed from the customer’s site to detect any anomalies on the link, all without disconnecting the head-end since the OADM will filter out the 1650 nm, therefore not affecting the remainder of the network.

Conclusion

CWDM testing challenges may be inevitable during each phase of the deployment, but with specialized equipment, these challenges can be overcomed completely. Tools including a CWDM OTDR, a CWDM channel analyzer and an out-of band OTDR are proved effective and valuable to reduce downtime and increase bandwidth at a minimum cost.

Simplify the Implementation of High Density 100G CXP

Data center bandwidth demands continue to grow, requiring higher capacity and throughput. The 100G/120G Ethernet is no longer new in data center optic market, but it’s still a complex act to efficiently and effectively upgrade existing 10G/40G architectures to these higher data rates, especially in a space-constrained application. In order to explore the approaches of smooth migration to high density 100G/120G network, this post will take multimode 100G CXP module as example, and illustrate some simplified scenarios when upgrading to these higher data rates.

Overview on 100G CXP Module

High density 100G CXP is very popular in the implementations up to 100Gbps for saving-space. This deployment can then leverage the 10G-per-lane channels to distribute the 10G data anywhere in the data center. 100G CXP module is designed to connect with an MTP/MPO-24 connector, which can be divided to 10x10G or 12x10G transceiver pairs. For 120G CXP, it is also possible to separate the signals into three QSFP+ transceivers, and then to three groups of 4x10G transceivers by using an 8 fibers MTP/MPO to LC breakout module or cable.

Direct Connectivity for two CXPs

For two 100GBASE-SR10 modules, direct link can be easily made via 100G MPO cable. For connecting two 120G CXPs, a cost-effective 24 fibers MPO trunk can also work well. Here uses an 24 fibers MPO (female) to MPO (female) OM4 polarity B trunk cable.

direct link for two 100G/120G CXP modules

Figure 1: direct link for two 100G CXP modules.

Connectivity Methods for CXP and SFP+/QSFP+

In this part, the scenarios applied for 100G to 10G connection, and 120G to 40G or 10G connection will be explained.

100G to 10G

Figure 2 shows a direct link for one 100G CFP module and ten 10G SFP+ modules. By using the 24 fibers MPO to LC duplex harness cable, the whole 100G from the CFP transceiver is connected to ten SFP+ transceivers (two LC duplex legs are not used in this link). The fanout legs are available to be the same length or staggered type, so as to meet different applications.

direct link for a 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s

Figure 2: direct link for a 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s.

In figure 3, the interconnect for CFP and SFP+ transceivers is more flexible than the direct link. Here the 160 fibers MTP/MPO (male) breakout patch panel allows connectivity to any duplex path reachable by the patch panel. This method offers ultimate flexibility in allowing connectivity to any row, rack or shelf. Moreover, this breakout module can support up to eight groups of this 100G to 10x10G transmission. In such a high density link, it is suggested to use HD patch cables or LC uniboot patch cables to enable quicker and better cable management.

interconnect solution for 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s

Figure 3: interconnect solution for 100G CFP to 10x10G SFP+s.

120G to 10G and 40G

When directly connecting one 120G CXP to twelve 10G SFP+ transceivers, a 24 fibers MTP-24 to 12 LC harness cables can do the job well. Here we use a customized high density bend insensitive female MTP-24 to 12 LC duplex OM4 breakout cable.

 direct link for 120G to 12x10G transceivers

Figure 4: direct link for 120G to 12x10G transceivers.

An option for breaking out a 120G CXP to three 40G QSFP+s is to use the 1×3 MTP/MPO conversion harness cable. Figure 5 illustrates implementation of a 1×24 strand MTP to 3×8 strand MTP conversion harness cable. Like the 12x10G segregation mentioned above, once split, the 3×8-fiber QSFP+ channels can be distributed through patch panels and 12-fiber based trunking to any area of the data center.

hybrid link for 120G CXP to 40G QSFP+s and 10G SFP+s

Figure 5: hybrid link for 120G CXP to 40G QSFP+s and 10G SFP+s.

Conclusion

This article has illustrated some simplified implementation examples of 100G CXP modules. 24 fibers MTP/MPO trunk cable are suited for connecting two CXP modules. Breakout cables can achieve quick connection for CXP and QSFP+ or SFP+ optics, but when flexible patching is needed in the link, it would be better to adopt breakout patch panel. If you need 100G optics, FS.COM can offer you fully tested compatible 100GBASE-SR10, 100GBASE-SR4, 100GBASE-LR4 and 100GBASE-ER4 transceivers, etc.

What Is IPv4 & IPv6 Dual Stack and MPLS Technique?

We usually see the switch products description as the following “Hardware support for IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack and rich MPLS features provide customers with a wealth of business features and routing functions, as well as hardware-based security features”. Then, what’s the IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack? What does the “MPLS” mean?

What Is IPv4 & IPv6 Dual Stack?
As we all know, the entire Internet world is currently running IPv4 (Internet Protocol Version 4). But we’ve run completely out of current IPv4-type addresses. So a new IP address format called IPv6 appears. The IPv6 format creates an IP address with a much longer number, which allows for a great many more IP addresses—so many, we should never run out again! Here’s an example of the difference between the two formats:

  • Sample IPv4 address: 192.168.1.2
  • Sample IPv6 address: 2001:0578:0123:4567:89AB:CDEF:0123:4567

One significant problem is that the two IP address formats aren’t compatible and total conversion to IPv6 is a way off. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) need to provide their customers with both IPv4 and IPv6 service. How to solve this problem? The answer is IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack. With the dual stack solution, every networking device, server, switch, router and firewall in an ISP’s network will be configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity capabilities. Most importantly, dual stack technology allows ISPs to process IPv4 and IPv6 data traffic simultaneously.

IPv4 & IPv6 Dual Stack

MPLS Technique Explanation
MPLS stands for “Multi-Protocol Label Switching”. It is a type of data-carrying technique for high-performance telecommunications networks. In a traditional IP network, each router performs an IP lookup, determines a next-hop based on its routing table, and forwards the packet to that next-hop. Rinse and repeat for every router, each making its own independent routing decisions, until the final destination is reached.

Multi-Protocol Label Switching_mpls

MPLS does “label switching” instead. The first device does a routing lookup, just like before. But instead of finding a next-hop, it finds the final destination router. And it finds a pre-determined path from “here” to that final router. The router applies a “label” based on this information. Future routers use the label to route the traffic without needing to perform any additional IP lookups. At the final destination router the label is removed. And the packet is delivered via normal IP routing.

Due to the labeling technology, the speed of performing lookups for destinations and routing is much faster than the standard IP table lookups non-MPLS routers have to perform. Besides, MPLS networks achieve greater Quality of Service (QoS) for their customers. FS.COM S5800-48F4S routing switches support for IPv4 & IPv6 dual stack and rich MPLS features and enhanced multicast and QoS capabilities can provide customers with a wealth of business features and routing functions, as well as hardware-based security features.

Layer 2 vs Layer 3 Switch: What’s the Difference?

Over the years, the average network has been dominated by the Layer 2 switch. Now as network complexity increases and applications demand greater functions from the network, Layer 3 switches are coming out of the data center and high level enterprise settings. Why this happens? What’s the difference between Layer 2 and Layer 3 switch? Which one should I deploy?

Layer 2 vs Layer 3 Switch
The main function of a Layer 2 is to help the traffic from devices within a LAN reach each other. A Layer 2 switch does this by keeping a table of all the MAC addresses it has learned and what physical port they can be found on. The MAC address is something that operates within Layer 2 of the OSI model (what defines how networks operate). Traffic being switched by MAC address is isolated within the LAN those devices are using. Therefore, when you need traffic to cross between LANs (or VLANs) is when we need a Layer 3 switch.

Layer 2 Switch

The most common Layer 3 device used in a network is the router. A router is able to look into the Layer 3 portion of traffic passing through it (the source and destination IP addresses) to decide how it should pass that traffic along. Since a router holds information about multiple networks (LAN WAN VLAN) it is also able to pass traffic along between these networks. This is routing. The Layer 3 switch functionally exists somewhere between being a Layer 2 switch and being a Gateway Router. It can be best described by what more it does compared to a Layer 2 switch and what less it does compared to a Gateway Router.

Layer 3 Switch

What Makes Layer 3 Switch Different?
When comparing the Layer 2 switch to a Layer 3 switch the first thing to look at is what additional software functionality you are getting. When a switch supports Dynamic Routing Protocols, it’s no longer a strictly Layer 2 switch. Because static routing allows traffic to be routed between VLANs. In fact, the switches that add only Static Routing to their software features are considered to be somewhere between a Layer 2 and full Layer 3 switch. Sometimes called Layer 2+ or Layer 3 Lite. Unlike Layer 2+ switch, Layer 3 switch is Dynamic Routing ,which are used to link large networks together and share routing tables between them. They can also allow for dynamic routing of multicast traffic on the network.

To Choose a Layer 2 Switch or Layer 3 Switch?
Now that we know the difference between the two layers, what metrics would you choose one over the other comes down to the flexibility of being able to route the packets. If you need to send data within a LAN, use Layer 2 switch. If you need to send the data to other buildings on campus or to a client site, use Layer 3 switch. FS.COM provides a series of Layer2/3 10G/40G/100G switches to meet Data Center and Enterprise Ethernet network requirements. If you are interested, welcome to visit our website www.fs.com or contact us via sales@fs.com for more detailed information.

100G CFP Modules Power and Connectors Comparison

In today’s market, only several vendors can provide 100G CFP modules, such as Cisco, Juniper, Brocade and Huawei. In this blog, I will compare the Cisco CFP modules and the Juniper CFP modules, and analyze the power and connectors of these modules.

100GBASE-SR10 CFP Modules
Both Cisco CFP-100G-SR10 and Juniper CFP-100GBASE-SR10 CFP module supports link lengths of 100 meters and 150 meters respectively on laser-optimized OM3 and OM4 multifiber cables. It primarily enables high-bandwidth 100-gigabit links over 24-fiber ribbon cables terminated with MPO/MTP-24 connectors. It can also be used in 10 x 10 Gigabit Ethernet mode along with ribbon to duplex fiber breakout cables for connectivity to ten 10GBASE-SR optical interfaces.

100GBASE-SR10 CFP Modules

100GBASE-LR4 CFP Modules
Both Cisco CFP-100G-LR4 and Juniper CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4 CFP module supports a link length of 10 kilometers on standard duplex single-mode fiber (SMF, G.652). However, the connectors of Cisco CFP-100G-LR4 are duplex SC, and the connectors of Juniper CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4 are duplex LC. 100 Gigabit Ethernet signal is carried over four wavelengths. Multiplexing and demultiplexing of the four wavelengths are managed within the device.

100GBASE-LR4 CFP Modules

100GBASE-ER4 CFP Modules
Both Cisco CFP-100G-ER4 and Juniper CFP-GEN2-CGE-ER4 CFP module can support link lengths up to 40 kilometers on standard duplex single-mode fiber (SMF, G.652). Like the 100GBASE-LR4 CFP modules, the connectors of Cisco CFP-100G-ER4 are duplex SC, and the connectors of Juniper CFP-GEN2-CGE-ER4 are duplex LC. Multiplexing and demultiplexing of the four wavelengths are managed within the device. The 100GBASE-ER4 CFP module meets the IEEE 802.3ba requirements for 100GBASE-ER4 performance and also supports Digital Optical Monitoring (DOM) of the transmit-and-receive optical signal levels.

Tx/Rx Power of Cisco and Juniper 100G CFP Modules
Minimum and maximum Tx/Rx Power of Cisco and Juniper 100G CFP Modules are displayed in the table below. We can see that there is no significant difference between Tx/Rx Power of Cisco and Juniper CFP modules.

P/N Connector Transmit Power Receive Power Wavelength
Cisco CFP-100G-SR10 OM3 100 m; OM4 150 m 24F-MPO/MTP min: -7.6 dBm
ma: -1.0 dBm
min: -9.5 dBm
max: 2.4 dBm
Ten lanes, 840 to 850 nm
Juniper CFP-100GBASE-SR10 OM3 100 m; OM4 150 m 24F-MPO/MTP min: -7.6 dBm
max: 2.4 dBm
min: -9.5 dBm
max: 2.4 dBm
840 through 860 nm
Cisco CFP-100G-LR4 10km duplpx SC min: -4.3 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
min: -10.6 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
Four lanes, 1295.6 nm, 1300.1 nm, 1304.6 nm, and 1309.1 nm
Juniper CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4 10km duplpx LC min: -4.3 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
min: -10.5 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
1294.53 through 1296.59 nm
1299.02 through 1301.09 nm
1303.54 through 1305.63 nm
1308.09 through 1310.19 nm
Cisco CFP-100G-ER4 40km duplpx SC min: -2.9 dBm
max: 2.9 dBm
min: –20.9 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
Same as CFP-100G-LR4
Juniper CFP-GEN2-CGE-ER4 40km duplpx LC min: -2.9 dBm
max: 2.9 dBm
min: –20.9 dBm
max: 4.5 dBm
Same as CFP-GEN2-100GBASE-LR4

As a leading and professional manufacturer and supplier of fiber optic subsystems and components. Fiberstore offers various 100G CFP modules which are ideal solutions for your 100GbE network. Our 100G transceivers are with high compatibility that can be compatible with many major brands. For more information, please contact us over sales@fs.com.

10G SFP+ DAC Cables for Intel X520 Adapter

SFP+ Direct Attach Cables integrate SFP+ compatible connectors with a copper cable into a low-latency, energy-efficient, and low-cost solution. DAC are available in several lengths up to 10 meters (33 ft) and are currently the best cabling option for short 10 Gigabit Ethernet connections.

10G-sfp-passive-copper-cable

Top-of-Rack (ToR) switches use the SFP+ form factor to provide high port density 10 Gigabit Ethernet in an efficient 1U form factor. Server and network storage vendors use 10 Gigabit SFP+ network adapters on their equipment for the same reason. DAC simplify rack cabling and termination. Each server and network storage device can be directly connected to the ToR switch, eliminating the need for intermediate patch panels. DAC are flexible enough for vertical cabling management within the rack architecture. The only cabling outside the rack is the ToR switch uplink connection to the aggregation layer, making moving racks easy.

DAC for Top-of-Rack (ToR) switches application

On the market, there are many 10 Gigabit SFP+ network adapters available. Customers require flexible and scalable network adapters to meet the rigorous requirements of running mission-critical applications in virtualized and unified storage environments. Among Intel X520 adapters seem very popular. Do you use Intel X520 adapters for your servers? Can’t find right and cheap SFP+ DAC cables for the Intel X520? This blog will give the solution.

Intel X520 adapters are provided with 4 models: X520-DA2, X520-SR1, X520-SR2 and X520-LR1. X520-SR1 is shipped with 1 SR SFP+ Optic and X520-SR2 is shipped with 2 SR SFP+ Optics. X520-LR1 is shipped with 1 LR SFP+ Optic. Among X520-DA2 has dual SFP+ ports and has no SFP+ optics shipped, which is the most suitable one for direct attach copper cables and the most popular one on the market.

X520-DA2 X520-SR1 X520-SR2 X520-LR1
Dual-port DAC Single-port SR fiber Dual-port SR fiber Single-port LR fiber
X520-DA2 X520-SR1 X520-SR2 X520-LR1

By checking up the Intel X520 adapters data sheet, SFP+ DAC twinaxial cables and SFP+ optics that can be used with X520 adapters are as the following.

Part Name Intel Product Code FS.COM Supply
1m SFP+ DAC XDACBL1M $11.00 for same-day shipping
3m SFP+ DAC XDACBL3M $15.00 for same-day shipping
5m SFP+ DAC XDACBL5M $24.00 for same-day shipping
SR SFP+ Optic E10GSFPSR $16.00 for same-day shipping
LR SFP+ Optic E10GSFPLR $34.00 for same-day shipping

SFP+ direct attach copper twinax cables offer the smallest 10G form factor and a small overall cable diameter for higher density and optimized rack space in 10G uplinks and are ideal for switch and network card connection. FS.COM provides full series of 10G SFP+ cable, which covers a wide range of applications. Both generic and brand compatible versions are available. All SFP+ cables are 100% tested to ensure the compatible and quality.

3rd Party Optical Transceivers vs OEM Switch Warranty

As we all know, 3rd party optical transceivers are much cheaper than Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) optical transceivers. Therefore, more and more companies are using and plan to use 3rd party optical transceivers in their network project. However, many original equipment manufacturer published limited warranty policy about 3rd party hardware. Then should we use 3rd party optical transceivers or not? Let’s get a look at most popular network equipment manufacturer warranty policies firstly.

3rd Party Optical Transceivers

Cisco
The Cisco guideline for support and warranty services for the use of third-party memory, cables, gigabit interface controllers (GBICs), filters, or other non-Cisco components is as follows:

When a customer reports a product fault or defect and Cisco believes the fault or defect can be traced to the use of third-party memory products, cables, GBIC’s, filters, or other non-Cisco components by a customer or reseller, then, at Cisco’s discretion, Cisco may withhold support under warranty or a Cisco support program such as SMARTnet™ service.
When a product fault or defect occurs in the network, and Cisco concludes that the fault or defect is not attributable to the use of third-party memory, cables, GBICs, filters, or other non-Cisco components installed by a customer or reseller, Cisco will continue to provide support for the affected product under warranty or covered by a Cisco support program.

Juniper
Juniper Networks is not obligated to provide services for any of the following:

Third-party devices (hardware, software, cabling, etc.) not provided by Juniper Networks, or problems associated with or arising directly or indirectly from such components. Problems with product that have been installed by any party other than (A) Juniper Networks or (B) a party authorized by Juniper Networks.

Brocade

In order to ensure proper operation of Brocade products, it is required that all Brocade systems utilize only Brocade supplied optical transceiver components. Brocade reserves the right to void warranty and service support offerings if optical transceiver components other than those supplied by Brocade are used in the operation of Brocade products.

HP

This HP Limited Warranty does not apply to expendable or consumable parts, with the exception of HP printing supplies and certain rechargeable batteries as specified below, and does not extend to any HP Hardware Product from which the serial number has been removed or that has been damaged or rendered defective by software, interfacing, parts or supplies not supplied by HP; HP is not responsible for any interoperability or compatibility issues that may arise when products, software, or options not supported by HP are used; If HP equipment is got defective because of using 3rd party hardware, then HP Limited Warranty does not apply.

Dell

What is covered by this limited hardware warranty? – This limited hardware warranty covers defects in materials and workmanship in your Dell-branded hardware products, including Dell-branded peripheral products.

What is not covered by this limited hardware warranty? – Using accessories, parts or components not supplied by Dell & Commercial hardware products that use, or in which have been installed, products or components that have not been provided by Dell.

How long does this limited hardware warranty last? This limited hardware warranty may be voided by Dell, at Dell’s sole discretion, if third party products that were not provided by Dell are installed on your Dell system.

Conclusion
Comparing some of the biggest network equipment vendor warranty policies we see that most of them have similar rules on using 3rd party optical transceivers. If problems are caused by 3rd party optical transceivers, then warranty support will be refused until optical transceivers are changed to OEM ones. In the mean while if defect to vendor’s equipment is caused by 3rd party optical transceiver (and it is proved by vendor) then warranty can also be voided. So, this leads to biggest question – Does 3rd party transceivers ensures the same working and quality standards as OEM optical transceivers?

The answer is yes! Because 3rd party optical transceivers are manufactured and assembled in the same factories where OEM branded ones are. Optical transceivers are standardized by SFP Multi source agreement. This means everyone can manufacture and supply optical transceivers. As a result there is absolutely no difference in hardware for official branded transceiver and reliable 3rd party optical transceiver, as much as four or ten times cost difference. The performance is the same because all manufacturers follow same rules same standards.

If there is no real difference between OEM optical transceivers and 3rd party transceivers, then why network equipment vendors has such strict warranty policies? That is because network equipment manufacturers has to make money. They will use all available resources to sell more of their production. So they make warranty policies which psychologically affects their customers, making them think that there will problems (warranty void) if they will use other vendor equipment’s (transceivers) in their OEM devices.

As the leading global manufacturer and supplier of compatible optical transceiver modules, Fiberstore (FS.COM) always specialized in compatibility breakthrough and insisted on the high performance of the optical components. Most of the common used transceivers which are designed to be compatible with many major brands are in stock and with very competitive prices for your options.