Category Archives: Bulk Fiber Cables

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Optical Fiber Cable?

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An optical fiber or fiber optic cable is a flexible, transparent fiber made by drawing glass, which are used most often as a means to transmit light between the two ends of the fiber and find wide usage in fiber-optic communications, where they permit transmission over longer distances and at higher bandwidths (data rates) than wire cables. Whether should I use optical fiber cables in my network? What are the advantages and disadvantages of optical fiber?

optical fiber

Advantages of Optical Fiber Cable

  • Bandwidth

Fiber optic cables have a much greater bandwidth than metal cables. The amount of information that can be transmitted per unit time of fiber over other transmission media is its most significant advantage.

  • Low Power Loss

An optical fiber offers low power loss, which allows for longer transmission distances. In comparison to copper, in a network, the longest recommended copper distance is 100m while with fiber, it is 2km.

  • Interference

Fiber optic cables are immune to electromagnetic interference. It can also be run in electrically noisy environments without concern as electrical noise will not affect fiber.

  • Size

In comparison to copper, a fiber optic cable has nearly 4.5 times as much capacity as the wire cable has and a cross sectional area that is 30 times less.

  • Weight

Fiber optic cables are much thinner and lighter than metal wires. They also occupy less space with cables of the same information capacity.  Lighter weight makes fiber easier to install.

  • Security

Optical fibers are difficult to tap. As they do not radiate electromagnetic energy, emissions cannot be intercepted. As physically tapping the fiber takes great skill to do undetected, fiber is the most secure medium available for carrying sensitive data.

  • Flexibility

An optical fiber has greater tensile strength than copper or steel fibers of the same diameter. It is flexible, bends easily and resists most corrosive elements that attack copper cable.

  • Cost

The raw materials for glass are plentiful, unlike copper. This means glass can be made more cheaply than copper.

Disadvantages of Optical Fiber Cable

  • Difficult to Splice

The optical fibers are difficult to splice, and there are loss of the light in the fiber due to scattering. They have limited physical arc of cables. If you bend them too much, they will break.

  • Expensive to Install

The optical fibers are more expensive to install, and they have to be installed by the specialists. They are not as robust as the wires. Special test equipment is often required to the optical fiber.

  • Highly Susceptible

The fiber optic cable is a small and compact cable, and it is highly susceptible to becoming cut or damaged during installation or construction activities. The fiber optic cables can provide tremendous data transmission capabilities. So, when the fiber optic cabling is chosen as the transmission medium, it is necessary to address restoration, backup and survivability.

  • Can’t Be Curved

The transmission on the optical fiber requires repeating at distance intervals. The fibers can be broken or have transmission losses when wrapped around curves of only a few centimeters radius.

Conclusion
Fiber optic cable has both advantages and disadvantages. However, in the long run, optical fiber will replace copper. In today’s network, fiber optic cable becomes more popular than before and is widely used. FS.COM, as a leading optics supplier, provides all kinds of optical fiber cables with high quality and low price for your option.

Related Article: What Are the Most Popular Fiber Optic Cable Types?

Tight-Buffered Distribution Cable Basis

Indoor/outdoor fiber optic cables include loose tube and tight buffer designs. These are available in a variety of configurations and jacket types to cover riser and plenum requirements for indoor cable and the ability to be run in duct, direct buried or aerial/lashed in the outside plant. Applications of tight-buffered distribution cable will be provided in this article. This blog provides information on tight-buffered distribution cable’s basic sense and its indoor and outdoor applications.

Construction of Tight-Buffered Distribution Cable
Standard tight-buffered distribution cable is available in fiber counts from 6 to 144 fibers. Distribution cable in 6, 12, and 24-fiber counts in a “single jacket” designs feature 900µm tight-buffered fibers surrounded by an aramid yarn strength member. Larger distribution cable (36 fibers and greater) features a “sub-unit” design that simplifies fiber identification, provides easy access and routing of the fibers and increases cable durability with a dielectric central strength member. For example, a 144-fiber cable usually has twelve 12-fiber sub-units while a 36-fiber cable could have six 6-fiber sub-units or three 12-fiber sub-units.

Tight-Buffered Distribution Cable Construction

900µm Buffer for Easy Fiber Termination
Tight-buffered distribution cable can be directly connected to optical equipment for the fibers normally have a 900µm buffer. Terminated fibers may be directly connected to equipment without use of a patch panel and accompanying jumper cables. Besides, no splices or splicing skills are needed, as with pigtails on loose tube gel-filled cables. In situations where the fibers will be mated and unmated frequently, or where there is general access to equipment, it is advisable to place terminated fibers in a patch panel to avoid damage to the connector/fiber interface.

900µm Buffer for Easy Fiber Termination

Plenum/Riser Tight-Buffered Distribution Cable for Indoor Applications
Fiber optic tight-buffered distribution cable is used within buildings to provide high-density connectivity and ease of installation. Applications include intra-building backbones, routing between telecommunications rooms and connectorized cables in riser and plenum environments. For trunking applications where fiber distribution cable is being run through environmental airflow spaces, we should plenum tight-buffered distribution cable. It is in compliance with NEC section 770.179(a) for installation in plenums and air ducts. In vertical runs, as shown in the figure below, we usually use riser tight-buffered distribution cable.

Plenum/Riser Tight-Buffered Distribution Cable

Armored LSZH Tight-Buffered Distribution Cable for Indoor/Outdoor Applications
Armored LSZH tight-buffered distribution cable features a double LSZH jackets with the outer jacket being of UV stabilised, water and moisture resistant. Between the 2 sheaths there is a corrugated steel tape making the cable rodent proof. The cable is suited for LAN backbones, direct burial, ducts, under floor or ceiling spaces.

4

Conclusion
The tight-buffered design provides a rugged cable structure to protect individual fibers during handling, routing and connectorization. Yarn strength members keep the tensile load away from the fiber. Multi-fiber, tight-buffered cables often are used for intra-building, risers, general building and plenum applications. FS.COM offers a wide range options on high-quality tight-buffered distribution cables which can meet your demands on indoor or indoor/outdoor applications. Same-day shipping from USA is available. For more information, please visit www.fs.com.

250um Bare Fiber vs. 900um Tight Buffer Fiber

Ever wonder the difference between loose-tube 250um bare fiber and tight-buffered 900um fiber? Loose-tube 250um and tight-buffered 900um fiber cables actually start with the same 250um bare fibers that feature the same size fiber core (i.e., 50um for multimode and 9um for singlemode), 125um cladding and soft 250um coating. The difference between these two cables all lies in the cable construction.

900um Fiber Adds an Additional Layer
Tight-buffered 900um fiber includes an additional 900um layer of hard plastic over the 250um fibers for protection. Within the cable, several of these color-coded 900um tight buffered fibers are situated around a central strength member and then covered with Kevlar or aramid yarn for protection, a rip cord and then the jacket.

250um Bare Fiber vs. 900um Tight Buffer Fiber
Tight-buffered 900um fiber cable comes in various fiber counts that typically range from 2 to 144 fibers, with larger fiber counts featuring fiber subunits of 6 or 12 fibers within the cable. For example, a 144-fiber cable usually has twelve 12-fiber subunits while a 36-fiber cable could have six 6-fiber subunits or three 12-fiber subunits.

900um fiber cable

250um Fiber Is Enclosed in Tubes
Loose-tube 250um fiber places up to 12 bare 250um fibers inside a flexible plastic tube, which are also color coded and situated around a central strength member with Kevlar or aramid yarn for protection. Buffered loose-tube cables feature an outer waterblocking tape around the tubes, beneath the outer jacket.

 250um fiber cableThe tubes themselves are gel-filled to prevent water migration, or they are available with a dry waterblocking technology—sometimes referred to as gel-free cable. Both of these materials are vital to prevent water from migrating into the tubes and potentially freezing, expanding and breaking the fiber. Dry waterblocking technology significantly reduces installation time by eliminating the need to clean off the gel prior to termination.

Loose-tube 250um fiber cable comes in various fiber counts that typically range from 6 to 144. With the exception of a 6-fiber cable, the fibers are grouped into sets of 12 for maximum density. Speaking of density, without the 900um plastic coating, loose-tube 250um fiber cables are less than half the size of 900um fiber cables—1.4 inch (35.6 mm) for a 144-fiber tight buffer cable and only 67 inch (17 mm) for an outdoor 144-fiber loose-tube cable.

From Outdoor to Indoor Applications
Generally speaking, tight-buffered 900um fiber cables are used for indoor applications, including intra-building riser and plenum applications and in the data center. Loose-tube 250um fiber cables are typically used in outside plant (OSP) applications, such as inter-building duct, aerial and direct buried installations.

cable terminationWhile indoor/outdoor cables are popular for eliminating the need for service entrance splicing to in-building cable, OSP loose-tube 250um cabling must be terminated within 50 feet of entering a facility. To accomplish this, breakout kits are used to build the 250um cable up for protection and termination to 900um connector boots. The problem with breakout kits is that they add additional material costs and a significant amount of labor. One option is to terminate the 250um fiber directly to 250um connector boots. This can speed network deployment in the data center and fiber-to-the-home applications.

Things You Should Know About Ribbon Optical Cable

Local area network (LAN) campus and building backbones, as well as data center backbones, are migrating to higher cabled fiber counts to meet increasing system bandwidth needs. Ribbon optical cables are now being deployed to meet this need, as they provide the highest fiber density relative to cable size, maximize utilization of pathway and spaces and facilitate ease of termination. This article may provide some knowledge of ribbon optical cable.

Ribbon Optical Cable Design

Ribbon optical cable is now being widely used in campus, building and data center backbone applications where fiber counts of more than 24 are required. This kind of cable offers robust performance equivalent to the stranded loose tube cable. It provides the maximum fiber density relative to cable diameter when compared to stranded loose tube and tight-buffered cable designs. The cable design characteristically consists of 12 to 216 fibers organized inside a central tube. There are two kinds of jacket material for ribbon optical cable. Non-flame-retardant jacket material is often used in outdoor applications while flame-retardant outer jackets are used for indoor applications. Picture below shows a basic construction of ribbon optical cable.

Ribbon Optical Cable

MTP Connector Makes a Easy Ribbon Optical Cable Termination

For many years, people have been reluctant to use ribbon optical cable in the LAN and data center because 12-fiber ribbon field terminations were limited. With the introduction of field-installable 12-fiber array connectors, 12-fiber ribbons are easily terminated with simplex and duplex connectors such as LC or SC connectors or with the MTP connector. The MTP connector (shown in the picture below) is a 12-fiber push/pull optical connector with a foot-print similar to the SC simplex connector. These high-density connectors are used to significantly accelerate the network cabling process, minimize errors and reduce congestion in patch panels.

MTP connector
Today, the MTP connector is commonly available in preterminated form—as a pigtail to be spliced onto a 12-fiber ribbon, or as a MTP patch cord which is terminated on each end (shown in the picture below). Many end-users are now using preterminated cables where the cable is factory terminated with MTP connectors and/or simplex or duplex connectors to ensure the highest quality connector insertion loss and return loss performance and to expedite the cable installation.

MTP patch cord

Ribbon Optical Cable Greatly Saves the Pathway and Spaces

Optimal cabled fiber density in data-center pathway and spaces is important to facilitate efficient cooling systems as well as for removal of abandoned cable in accordance, so it’s essential to maximize use of pathway and spaces. Ribbon fiber cables offer up to 45 percent space savings, and three times the fiber-tray capacity over traditional bulkier cable solutions. At the same time, it also minimizes the cable tray weight.

Conclusion

Because the ribbon optical cable offers the highest fiber packing density to maximize pathway and space utilization in ducts and raceways as well as patch panels, it is now being deployed in areas where stranded loose tube and tight-buffered cable have historically been used. Fiberstore provide all kinds of ribbon optical cables (12 to 216 fibers) and MTP connectors, as well as MTP truck patch cables with low price and high quality. For more information, please visit www.fs.com.

Loose Tube or Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable?

Fiber optic cable is available in many physical variations, such as single and multiple conductor constructions, aerial and direct burial styles, plenum and riser cables, etc. But there are two basic styles of fiber optic cable construction: loose tube and tight buffered. From the picture below, we can see that loose tube cables hold more than one optical fiber, each individually sleeved core is bundled loosely within an all-encompassing outer jacket. However, in tight buffered cables, there are not so many cables as loose tube cables.

loose tube
Loose Tube Cable

Loose tube cables are designed for harsh environmental conditions in the outdoors. In loose tube cables, the coated fiber “floats” within a rugged, abrasion resistant, oversized tube which is filled with optical gel. Since the tube does not have direct contact with the fiber, any cable material expansion or contraction will not cause stress on the fiber. This gel also helps protect the fibers from moisture, making the cables ideal for high humidity environments. Cable containing loose buffer-tube fiber is generally very tolerant of axial forces of the type encountered when pulling through conduits or where constant mechanical stress is present such as cables employed for aerial use. Since the fiber is not under any significant strain, loose buffer-tube cables exhibit low optical attenuation losses. Although loose-tube gel-filled fiber optic cables are used for high-fiber-count, long-distance telco applications, they are an inferior design for the Local Area Network applications where reliability, attenuation stability over a wide temperature range and low installed cost are the priorities.

Tight Buffered Cable

Tight buffered cables, in contrast, are optimized for indoor applications. In the tight buffer construction, instead of using the gel layer loose tube cable has, it uses a two-layer coating. One is plastic and the other is waterproof acrylate. So tight buffered cables may be easier to install, because there is no gel to clean up and it does not require a fan out kit for splicing or termination. Because the fiber is not free to “float” however, tensile strength is not as great. Tight buffer cable is normally lighter in weight and more flexible than loose-tube cable and is usually employed for less severe applications. Such applications include moderate distance transmission for telco local loop, LAN, SAN, and point-to-point links in cities, buildings, factories, office parks and on campuses. Tight-buffered cables offer the flexibility, direct connectability and design versatility necessary to satisfy the diverse requirements existing in high performance fiber optic applications.

Each construction has inherent advantages. The loose buffer tube offers lower cable attenuation from microbending in any given fiber, plus a high level of isolation from external forces. Under continuous mechanical stress, the loose tube permits more stable transmission characteristics. The tight buffer construction permits smaller, lighter weight designs for similar fiber configuration, and generally yields a more flexible, crush resistant cable. So, you should choose the appropriate cable for your applications. Fiberstore offers both loose tube and tight buffer cables with high quality and low price. It may be your optimal choice to buy optic products.

What Are the Most Popular Fiber Optic Cable Types?

Recently, as the fiber optic cable is used more and more widely than earlier years, people also know more about the fiber optic cables than before. Usually, we learn that the fiber optic cables are divided into two basic types: single mode fiber and multimode fiber. However, according to the fiber optic cable is used for indoor or outdoor, there are many other fiber types too. These fiber optic cable types are all the popular ones which are available in the current market. Then I will introduce these various fiber types to you in this article.

Indoor Fiber Optic Cables

In terms of indoor fiber optic cables, distribution cable, breakout cable, ribbon cable and LSZH cable are some popular types. Distribution cable and breakout cable all contain several jacketed simplex optical fibers packaged together inside an outer jacket, but in distribution fiber optic cable, tight buffered fibers are bundled together, with only the outer cable jacket of the cable protecting them. Besides, buffered fiber in distribution cable is 900 µm, which is smaller in size and costs less than breakout cable. Distribution cable is usually installed in intra-building backbone and inter-building campus locations. And breakout fiber optic cable is suitable for short riser and plenum applications. Ribbon cable includes up to 12 fibers contained side by side within a single jacket and is often used for network applications and data centers. LSZH cables are offered as an alternative for halogen-free applications. They are less toxic and slower to ignite which makes them a good choice for many internal installations.

breakout fiber optic cable

Outdoor Fiber Optic Cables

In terms of indoor fiber optic cables, however, tight buffered cables, loose tube cables, armored cables and submarine cables are some common popular fiber cable types. Among them, submarine fiber optic cables become more and more popular in recent years. These cables are used in fresh or salt water. To protect them from damage by fishing trawlers and boat anchors they have elaborately designed structures and armors. Other cable has armors is armored cable. Armored fiber optic cable includes an outer armor layer for mechanical protection and to prevent damage. They can be installed in ducts or aerially, or directly buried underground. Armor is surrounded by a polyethylene jacket. Tight buffered cable and loose tube cable are two early common outdoor fiber cables. Tight buffered cables have riser and plenum rated versions. These cables are flexible, easy to handle and simple to install. In loose tube cables, tube encloses multiple coated fibers that are surrounded by a gel compound that protects the cable from moisture in outside environments. This cable is restricted from indoor use, typically allowing entry not to exceed 50 feet.

Armored Fiber Optic Cable

All these indoor and outdoor fiber optic cables play an important role in optical network. As they have different characteristics, they have different applications too. For this reason, when you choose fiber optic cables, you must take their usability into consideration. For more information, you can visit Fiberstore, which designs and manufactures all these popular fiber optic cables.

Armored Fiber Optic Cable

Definition of armored fiber optic cable
Armored Fiber Optic Cable, just as the name implies, is that there is a layer of additional protective metal armoring of the fiber optic cable.
Armored Fiber CableFunction
Armored fiber cable plays a very important role in long-distance line of fiber optic cable. A layer of metal armoring in the scarf-skin of fiber optic cable protects the fiber core from rodent, moist and erosion.

Classification
According to the place of use, there are indoor armored fiber optic cables and outdoor armored fiber optic cables.

Indoor armored fiber optic cable
Indoor armored fiber optic cable is mainly used in interior, so it must be flexible and can be installed in the corner and some narrow places. Besides, indoor armored fiber optic cable experiences less temperature and mechanical stress, but they have to be fire retardant, emit a low level of smoke in case of burning. And indoor armored fiber cables must allow a small bend radius to make them be amendable to vertical installation and handle easily.

Indoor armored fiber optic cable can be divided into simplex armored fiber optic cable and duplex armored fiber optic cable. The main difference is that simplex armored fiber optic cable is the cable that not contains stainless steel wire woven layer, and duplex armored fiber optic cable is the cable that contains stainless steel hose and stainless steel wire woven which are of compressive property, resistance to deflection, rodent resistance, anti-torque and so on.

Outdoor armored fiber optic cable
Outdoor armored fiber optic cables are made to protect the optical fiber to operate safely in complicated outdoor environment. Most armored outdoor fiber cables are loose buffer design, with the strengthen member in the middle of the whole cable, the loose tubes surround the central strength member.

Outdoor armored fiber optic cable can be divided into light armored fiber optic cable and heavy armored fiber optic cable. Light armored fiber optic cable is with steel tape and aluminium tape which can strengthen rodent protection. Heavy armored fiber optic cable is equipped with a circle of steel wire, and usually used in riverbed and seabed.

Installation
There are two installation methods of armored fiber optic cable. One is buried directly in the ground, and the other is aerial optical cable.

For direct burial fiber cable, armored fiber optic cable is in the position to resist external mechanical damage, prevent erosion and resist rodent. In addition, because of different soil and environment, the depth of burying under the ground is about between 0.8m-1.2m.

On the other hand, aerial optical cable is the optical cable that hanging on the pole. This kind of installation way of armored fiber optic cable can prevent fiber core from any kind of severe environment, such as typhoon, ice, and people or animals. Aerial armored optical cable mostly uses central loose tube armored fiber optic cable (GYXTW) and stranded loose tube armored fiber optic cable (GYTA). The features of GYXTW are that can contain up to 12 fiber cores, the loose tube is centrally situated with good excess length and minimizes the influence of lateral crush, and double wire as strength member provides excellent strain performance. GYTA is suitable for installation for long haul communication and LANs, especially suitable for the situation of high requirements of moisture resistance. GYTA is with compact structure; the cable jacket is made of strong Polyethylene. This armored fiber optic cable features the good mechanical and temperature performance. GYTA is also with high strength loose tube that is hydrolysis resistant and the optical cable filling materials ensure high reliability, its APL makes the cable crush resistant and moisture proof. The GYTA fiber optic cable is available from 2 cores to 144 cores.

Some Common Types of Indoor Cables

Optical fiber cables for indoor cabling are used for the construction of horizontal subsystem and SCS building backbone cabling subsytems. They differ form cables used for outdoor cabling by two key parameters.

Indoor fiber optic cable is tight buffer design, usually they consist of the following components inside the cable, the FRP which is non-metallic strengthen member, the tight buffer optical fiber, the Kevlar which is used to further strength the cable structure, making it resist high tension, and the cable outer jacket. The trend is to use LSZH or other RoHS compliant PVC materials to make the cable jacket; this will help protect the environment and the health of the end users.

Indoor Cables

Cables for indoor applications include the following:

* Simplex cables
* Duplex cables
* Multifiber cables
* Heavy-, light-, and plenum-duty cables
* Breakout cables
* Ribbon cables

Although thes categories overlap, they represent the common ways of referring to fibers. Figure 7-5 shows cross sections of several typcial cables types.

Simplex Cables

A simplex fiber cable consists of a single strand of glass of plastic fiber. Simplex fiber is most often used where only a single transmit and/or receive line is required between devices or when a multiplex data signal is used (bi-directional communication over a single fiber).

Duplex Cables

A duplex fiber cable consists of two strands of glass or plastic fiber. Typically found in a “zipcord” construction format, this cable is most often used for duplex communication between devices where a separate transmit and receive are required.

Duplex cable is used instead of two simplex cables for aesthetics and convenience. It is easier to handle a single duplex cable, there is less chance of the two channels becoming confused, and the appearance is more pleasing. Remember, the power cord for your lamp is a duplex cable that could eaily be two separate wires. Does a single duplex cord in the lamp not make better sense? The same reasoning prevails with fiber optic cables.

Loose Tube Cables

loose tube cable

The loose tube variety contains one or more hard buffer tubes, which house between 1 and 12 coated fibers. The hard buffer tubes are also filled with a gel to provide vibration and moisture protection for the fibers. The fibers lie loosely in the tubes, which are wound into the cable in a reversing helical fashion and are actually longer than the outer sheath of the cable. This arrangement allows for a small amount of stretch in the outer sheath when installing the cable. Loose tube cable is used most often in OSP construction because it is designed for a tough outdorr environment use. See Figure-1 for the physical make-up of a typical loose tube cable.

Breakout Cables

Breakout cabke

Breakout cables have several individual simplex cables inside an outer jacket. The breakout cables shown in Figure 2 use two dielectric fillers to keep the cables positioned, while a Mylar wrap surrounds the cables/fillers. The outer jacket includes a ripcord to make its removal fast and easy. The point of the breakout cable is to allow the cable subunits inside to be exposed easily to whatever length is needed. Breakout cables are typically available with two or four fibers, although larger cables also find use.

Ribbon Cables

ribbon cable

Ribbon cable uses a number of fibers side by side in a single jacket. Originally, Ribbon fiber cable was used for outdoor cables (see Figure 3). Today they also find use in premises cabling and computer applications. The cables, typically with up to 12 fibers, offer a very small cross section. They are used to connect equipment within cabinets, in network applications, and for computer data centers. In addtion, they are comatible with multifiber array connectors. Ribbon cables are available in both multimode and single-mode versions.

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The Application and Types of Armored Fiber Optic Cable

What Is Armored Fiber Optic Cable?
Armored fiber optic cable consists of a cable surrounded by a steel or aluminum jacket which is then covered with a polyethylence jacket to protect it from moisture and abrasion. It may be run aerially, installed in ducts, or placed in underground enclosures with special protection from dirt and clay intrusion.

armored fiber optic cable

Armored fiber optic cable is often installed in a network for added mechanical protection. Two types of armoring exist: interlocking and corrugated. Interlocking armor is an aluminum armor that is helically wrapped around the cable and found in indoor and indoor/outdoor cables. It offers ruggedness and superior crush resistance. Corrugated armor is a coated steel tape folded around the cable longitudinally. It is found in outdoor cables and offers extra mechanical and rodent protection.

Types Of Armored Cable

indoor armored cable

Armored cable can be divided into indoor armored cable and outdoor armored cable. With the fast development of fiber optic communication technology and the trend of FTTX, indoor fiber optic cables are more and more required to be installed between and inside buildings. Typical indoor armored cable types include GJFJV, GJFJZY, GJFJBV, GJFJBZY, GJFDBV and GJFDBZY. Compared with outdoor use fiber cable, indoor fiber cable experience less temperature and mechanical stress, but they have to be fire retardant, emit a low level of smoke in case of burning. And indoor armored cables allow a small bend radius to make them be amendable to vertical installation and handle easily.

Features of Indoor Armored Fiber Cable

* Good mechanical property and environment property.
* Soft, agility, convenience for connect.
* Flexible and Easy to Handle
* Cables with Improved Attenuation Available
* Adapt to harsh environments and man-made damage.

outdoor armored fiber cable

Outdoor Armored Fiber Cable are made to protect the optical fiber to operate safely in complicated outdoor environment. Most Outdoor Armored fiber cables are loose buffer design, with the strengthen member in the middle of the whole cable, the loose tubes surround the central strength member. Inside the loose tube there is waterproof gel filled, whole cable materials used and gels inside cable between the different components (not only inside loose tube) will help make the whole cable resist of water.

Features

* Excellent attenuation performance
* Dry water blocking for moisture protection
* Polyethylene jacket for weather and UV protection
* Breakout kits available
* Corrugated Steel Tape
* Rodent Resistant
* Waterblock gel available

Application of Armored Cable

Armored fiber optic cable is used in direct buried outside plant applications where a rugged cable is needed and/or for rodent resistance. Armored cable withstands crush loads well, for example in rocky soil, often necessary for direct burial applications. Cable installed by direct burial in areas where rodents are a problem usually have metal armoring between two jackets to prevent rodent penetration. Another application for armored cable is in data centers, where cables are installed under the floor and one worries about the fiber cable being crushed. Indoor armored cables may have nonmetallic armor. Metallic armored cable is conductive, so it must be grounded properly.As with other fiber optic components, there are different names or meanings used. “Armor” in some companies’ jargon denotes a twisted heavy wire rope type cable surrounding the entire poly cable sheath/jacket. Single or double armor (two opposite ply layers of the steel wire) is typically used underwater near shore and shoals. Inner metallic sheath members of aluminum and/or copper are used for strength and for buried cable locating with a tone set.

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Fiber Optic Cable Circuit Also Need Lightning Protection

Some time ago a customer bought the fiber optical cables from our fs.com, but he asked me if it can be used in frequent areas of lightning and if he needs to lightning protection. Well, As for this problem, I give the customer this explanation.

Suitable cable barrier property makes its lightning protection is not so obvious as coax and open cable circuit. And in the process of rapid development of fiber optic cables, safety grounding is often misunderstood and even forgotten. With a large number of adoptions of optical fiber cable, the situation of the fiber optical cable circuit from lightning often occurs these years. Fiber optic cable circuit has a great deal of capacity and the easiest links that be lightning struck is buried links, and it is also difficult to repair, so once it is in trouble, will cause huge losses. This page mainly introduces the fiber optic cable circuit lightning protection.

Lightning Protection

Fiber optic cable has no electrical conductivity, can protect from impact current, but in order to male high capacity optical cables from environmental events, fiber optic cables must have armored cable components and when electric line close to short and a lighting strike, people will feel current ac or surge current, harm the safety or damage the link road equipment. Related product: adss fiber

Lightning has the trend to find the minimum impedance path to bleed thundercloud charge opposite charges neutralize underground. When lightning the land or buildings, lightning point potential while the cable extends to the very far, far end can be regarded as a potential 0, so the potential of lightning strikes near the cable is also regarded as 0. Such colony formation and fiber optic cable between the lightning point of great potential difference, the potential difference exceeds the compressive strength of Jiang Lei point between the outer sheath of the cable will breakdown the outer sheath formed from lightning point to the metal components arc channel, so a lot of lightning current flock to the cable, causing serious damage to the cable. ? It is the time to use optical fiber cable st termination kit. Cable lines in the construction inevitably damage PE (polyethylene) jacket, another rat-bite, external staff may cause the cable exposed metal components. These points will be easy to expose a strong electrical charge is introduced or lightning cable, causing damage.

According to relevant data show that in the following cases, cable lines susceptible to lightning strikes:

  • Metal sheaths, strengthen the core or the insulation lower copper cable.
  • Mutation terrain, soil resistivity changes in the larger area.
  • Cable trees or tall buildings with a single gauge are not enough time.

According to the above analysis, the same cable line to be concerned about its main work. Fiber optic cable lines for lightning protection, can target local weather and terrain and other natural conditions, a targeted manner. After analysis of a few lightning cable, I found that the cable line construction and maintenance should pay attention to the following questions.

aerial cable

First, as for aerial cables, one of the outdoor fiber optic cable, the connector box usually has to the structure of the core can be broken even, whether using electrical connected or disconnected, metal pressure plate structure is superior to the self-contained bolt connection, and the self-contained horizontal hole is better than vertical slot structure, it is a problem that should be paid attention to when choosing connector box.

Second, for underground cable lines protection, first of all, station grounding method, in the joint of the metal part of the cable shall be connected, the relay length of cable, moisture proof layer, strengthens core armored layer connected state.In both ends (station), the wrong layer, reinforcement, they can moisture proof layer should be through the arrester grounding.

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