Category Archives: Fiber Patch Panel

Does Cat6 on Cat5e Patch Panel or Cat5e on Cat6 Patch Panel Work?

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In the market, there exist both Cat5e patch panel and Cat6 patch panel. We know that Cat5e patch panels are meant to be used with Cat5e cable, and Cat6 patch panels are meant to be used with Cat6 cable, but what’s the difference between Cat5e and Cat6 patch panels? Can I use Cat6 cable on Cat5e patch panels or can I use Cat5e cable on Cat6 patch panels? Answers will be provided in this blog.

Cat6 on Cat5e Patch Panel

Can I Use Cat6 on Cat5e Patch Panel?

There isn’t much practical difference in the patch panels themselves. There is a difference in the wire gauge specified between Cat5e and Cat6. The cat6 wire is thicker. Cat6 usually has 23 AWG copper conductors compared to only 24 AWG in Cat5e cable. Another factor making Cat6 a larger wire than Cat5e is the fact that between each of the four pairs in a Cat6 cable there is a spline that will separate each pair from one another. Separating the pairs helps reduce cross-talk between the pairs and gives you a better signal. However, this spline also increases the diameter of the cable. Regardless of the size difference in Cat5e vs Cat6, the fact was that Cat6 cable is backward compatible with Cat5e. Yes, Cat6 is often times a larger cable, but this in no way affects its use with Cat5e patch panels. Feel free to use Cat5e patch panels if you already have them. You can always upgrade them later.

Can I Use Cat5e on Cat6 Patch Panel?

In addition to using Cat6 on Cat5e patch panel, we may also across some situations where we want to use Cat5e on a Cat6 patch panel. According to the passage above, we know that Cat6 cable is thicker than Cat5e, so if I use Cat5e on a Cat6 patch panel, will it be too loose? Although Cat6 individual twisted pairs insulation is usually thicker than Cat5e, this is usually never a problem with termination, only with how many cables you can stuff through a piece of conduit. So, will a Cat5e cable be “looser” terminated on a Cat6 jack, slightly yes, but electrically it will still make contact and work fine. But you should mind that your cabling channel will default to the lowest Catx component. Even though the patch panel says Cat6, with Cat5e cables you should only expect Cat5e performance on those jacks.

Conclusion

When punching down Cat5e wire on a Cat6, the Cat5e wire is enough smaller that it is possible to get what looks like a good punch, but the insulation on the wire is not actually penetrated or is only partially penetrated by the vampire jaw of the punch block. When punching down Cat6 wire on a Cat5e panel, the larger wire can end up bending or even breaking the vampire jaws on the punch down block. In both cases, using care and testing each connection, you can usually make it work. If you’re just doing one panel at home you are probably OK. Although it can both work well, we don’t recommend to do like this. Use the Cat5e on Cat5e patch panel and Cat6 on Cat6 patch panel will get the best performance. FS.COM provide both high-density Cat5e patch panels for Fast Enthernet applications and Cat6 patch panels for 1-Gigabit Enthernet applications. Easy to management and conserves data centers rack space. For more information, please visit www.fs.com.

Why Not Use Cable Lacing Bars to Manage Your Messy Cables?

Cable lacing bars, also called lacer bars, consist of a metal bar that mounts to the rear of a standard 19″ rack or cabinet, behind a patch panel. These bars provide support and management of cables that are secured to the bar with cable ties or adjustable clips. Each cable lacing bar occupies 1/3 to 2/3 of a rack space and can secure and manage up to 24 cables in 1 RU. They are usually used to support and manage cables in telecommunication rooms, which provide strain relief, bend radius control, superior aesthetics and improve organisation and routing of cable.

cable lacing bars

How to Use the Cable Lacing Bars?
In fact, the process of installing a cable lacing bar is very easy. As shown in the figure below, we only need to install the cable lacing bar to the rack firstly, and then use the cable tie to fix the cables to the cable lacing bar.

lacing bars

Which Type Cable Lacing Bars Should I Choose?
In order to meet different cabling management needs, there are also many different cable lacing bars available in the market. Below some common cable lacing bars are listed, and you can choose the right one for your network according to your specific cabling environment.
1. Round Lacer Bars
Use the 1RU round lacer bar when a small profile is required and for lacing small or individual horizontal cable runs. 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

Round Lacer Bars
2. Rectangular Lacer Bars
Use the 1RU aluminum lacer bar when lacing cables vertically or horizontally. Aluminum construction provides the ability to drill holes to attach tie saddles, mount electrical boxes, etc. This lacer bar can also be used to support the rear of equipment. 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

Rectangular Lacer Bars
3. L-Shaped Lacer Bars
“L” shaped lacer bars are strong and provide fixed tie points. Recommended for larger runs of cable. They are available in 2”, 4” and 6” offset. Choose the appropriate offset bar based on the distance from the rear of equipment to the rack rail.

L-Shaped Lacer Bars
4. Round Lacer Bars with Offset
Use the round lacer bar with offset when lacing small bundles or individual cables off the rear of equipment, patch panels and other components to relieve cable stress from the connections. They are available in 1.5” offset and 4” offset respectively (figure below). Choose the appropriate offset based on the distance from the rear of equipment to the rack rail. 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

Round Lacer Bars with Offset
5. 90º Bend Lacer Bars
These 90° bend offset lacer bars are similar to other offset round lacer bars, but feature 90° bends to provide full-width support. Can also be used to provide clearance around components that extend past the rear rack rail (16-5/8” open width). 1/4” diameter rod with flattened ends.

90º Bend Lacer Bars
6. Horizontal Lacer Panel
Use the horizontal lacer panel for lacing large amounts of cable or mounting devices. Two rack space high, the horizontal lacer panel features a large flange, numerous cable tie points and more surface for mounting.

Horizontal Lacer Panel

Cable lacing bars are a useful and cost effective cable management solution for rack or enclosure systems. These bars are essential in helping avoid cable strain especially when trying to run cables from one side of the enclosure to the other. FS.COM offers a full line of cable lacing bars to fit a variety of applications offering end users flexibility and convenience to prevent cable strain. Higher density applications may be addressed with FS.COM cable manager.

Video Patch Panel With Patch Cable

The jacks commonly used in patch panels in the U.S. conform to Western Electric standard dimensions. The number of insertion cycles a jack can endure should be rated in the tens of thousands. The factors affecting the life and reliablility of a jack include contact wear and failure of the termination switch. Descirable features include the following:

● Contacts fully isolated from the panel.
● Sealed metal housing to keep out contaminants and provide EMI protection.
● Easy replacement from the front of the panel.
● Low VSWR (below 600 MHz)
● High signal isolation (40 dB)
● 75 Ω characteristic impedance.
● Wide designation strips, making it easier to label the field and to allow more flexibility in selecting names that will fit on the lables.

If a patch cable is inserted in the signal path of a timed video system, it will delay the signal by an amount determined by its length and physical properties. The patch thereby alters the timing of the signal path. This can be avoided by using phase-matched normal-through fiber patch panels. The design of these patch panels anticipates the delay caused by a fixed length of patch cable by including that length in the loop-through circuit.

With phase-matched panels, the normaling connection in each connector module includes a length of cable that provides a fixed delay through the panel, usually 3 ft (0.914m). If a patch cord of the same length as the internal cable is used to make connections between patch points, the delay will be the same as that of the normal-through panel. When a fiber optic patch cord is plugged in, it is substituted for the loop cable through the swiching mechanism normally used in normalled patch conncetors. Thus, critical timing relationships can be maintained. Figure 6.21 shows a phase-matched patch panel.

In a normal uncompensated patch panel, when a cable is used to patch between two points on the panel, the length of the patch cord is added to that of the cables connected to the patch. The additional cable length delays the signal by approximately 1.52 ns/ft (5 ns/m). To avoid the delay probles associated with conventional patch panels, phase-matched normal-through video patch panels should be used.

If phase-matched patch panels are used, all of the patch cord must be the same length as the delay built into the patch panel. Obviously, if all of the patch cords must be the same short length for the phase-matched panel, it would not be possible to patch between panels that are separated by a longer distance than the cord can reach. This limitation should be considered when laying out patch panels in a rack.

Color-coded cables can be specified. When different-length patch cords are specified, different colors can be used to distinguish one length from another.

Fiberstore specializes in fiber optic patch cable assemblies and fiber optic network devices manufacturing since 1995, we are known as the fiber optic cable manufacturer for the excellent products quality, competitive prices, fast delivery and good service.  Our fiber optic cables are available with combinations of LC, SC, ST, FC, and MTRJ connectors and come in 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 meter lengths (and OM3 cables up to 30 meters).  We offer LC fiber optic cable, SC fiber optic patch cables, SC LC fiber patch cable ect. We not only offer OEM fiber optic patch cord assemblies to some world leading companies in this industry, but we also cooperate with many other companies from all over the world and support these partners to win in the market.

Punch-Down Blocks and Patch Panels

The cable runs in a structured cabling environment terminate in a punch-down block, which is usually a 66-block or a 110-block, or BIX- or Krone-style blocks, “Cabling System Connections and Termination.” The 110-block is most commonly used for voice and data cabling termination, although you will find many installations that use a 110-block for termianation voice systems and patch panels for terminating data systems. Punch-down block termination provides a cross-connect from one cable set to another, allowing for easier moves, adds, and changes (MACs) as the need arises.

A punch-down block is mounted to a backboard, which is usually made of plywood and secured to the wall of a TC. If you install cabling on more than floor, each floor must have a separate punch-down block with terminations for the cable drops from the higher floors. Backbone cables should be installed with 10-foot service coils at the termination points, which are commonly located on the backboard in the closet. Figure 1 illustrates a typical TC.

Install patch cables from the punch-down block to a patch panel. The purpose of the patch panel is to connect the backbone system to networking equipment such as a hub or router. End-user equipment, which includes workstations, network printers and scanners, and other shared electronic equipment, generally connect to a hub (also called a concentrator) or router via RJ-45 cable jacks or outlets.

There are pros and cons to using cross-connect blocks. They offer higher densities and require less space than patch panels, and also are less expensive. On the other hand, they are the least friendly for making moves, additions, and changes to the configuration. Skill is involved in removing and rea-ranging cables. When using patch panels, almost anyone can rearrange the system. In both situations security, ease of attachment, expense, and physical space are all considerations.

Fiber optic patch panels are commonly use fiber optic management unit. When you install and manage the fiber optic links, you may encounter hundreds or even thousands of fiber optic cables and cable connections, fiber optic management products are used to offer space and protection for the fiber cables and cable links, and they make it easier for the management and troubleshoot work. Our fiber optic patch panels are all sliding type, they are compatible to use with equipment and cable assembly products from other companies. Now you can see the two products from our store. They are SC fiber patch panel, 24 Port Fiber Patch Panel.

12 port  OS1/2 9μm Duplex Plastic SC Fiber Patch Panel

SC Fiber Patch Panel

Features of FS001 SERIES MOLDED

● Compatible with Leviton fiber adapter panels
● Adapter panels offered in LC, SC, ST, and blank styles, fit for all Opt-X rack-mount and wall-mount enclosures and VertiGO® panels
● Equipped with plastic dust caps to make connecting panels tool-free and efficient
● Integrated couplers eliminate “rattle” and loose fit
● Captive push-lock pins allow for quick tool-less installationCaptive push-lock pins allow for quick tool-less installation
● Exceeds optical performance standards and meets all other applicable standards

12 pack LC Duplex 24 Port Fiber Patch Panel Blue

24 port fiber patch panel

● Compatible with BlackBox Fiber Adapter Panel
● Adapter panels snap easily into all standard fiber enclosures, cabinets, and patch panels, including all Black Box® models.
● High-density panels with ST or LC connectors are available.
● Easy way to patch fiber cables to termination enclosures

We supply many fiber ptic patch panels. They are with types to fit from 12 fibers to 72 fiber management demand. These fiber optic patch panels are with optional various kinds of fiber optic adapters and fiber optic pigtails, types including SC, LC, ST, FC, MU, E2000, etc.  We have a number of different customizable options available to fit whatever application you require. With products compatible for trusted brands including Black Box, Wirewerks, Mr-technologies, Corning, Leviton, Panduit Opticom adapter pannel and more.

Bare Fiber Adapter Installation Guide

Bare fiber adapter is a typical type of fiber optic adapters that places industry standard connectors on unterminated fiber. It is contained in a durable aluminum-alloy housing which is easy to stabilize any magnetic surface for hands free use. Bare fiber adapter provides a temporary connection that eliminates the time consuming process of splicing jumpers onto individual fibers to testing, allowing users to easily test and detect fiber damages anywhere, anytime.

Bare fiber adapters enable quick and easy temporary connections of single mode and multimode fibers. These adaptors are very useful for connecting fibers to fiber optic power meter, optical time-domain reflectometers (OTDRs) and a variety of other instruments, enabling in-situ functional testing without having to attach a permanent connector.

Bare fiber adapters provide a simple and effective way to use un-terminated fibers with commercial receptacles. Here is the installation guide for the bare fiber adapters.

Attaching the patch cord
Clean connectors on fiber jumper or launch reel. Position connector on fiber jumper or launch reel with bare fiber adapter connector port. Insert the connector into the bare fiber adapter connector port until hear a click.

Preparing the fiber
Remove 6 inches of jacket and Kevlar. Remove 1 inch of coating and cladding. Cut the fiber 12mm-15mm long with fibre cleavers

Inserting the fiber
Clean the bare fiber. Press and hold down the button (There is a button on the adapter) while slowly and carefully inserting the bare fiber into the fiber port. Open the window to visually see the proper alignment of the bare fiber in the V-groove. To prevent accidental breakage of the glass fiber, slowly insert 1/8 inch to 1/4 inch of fiber at a time. Rotate the fiber until the glass aligns with the v-groove to enter the connector port. Push the fiber until it stops in the connector port After that, releaser the button to secure the fiber.

Removing the fiber
Press and hold down the button while slowly and carefully pulling the bare fiber out of the fiber port. Be sure to check for any broken glass fiber pieces after removing the bare fiber from the adapter.

Removing the jumper cable
Slowing pull the fiber jumper connector out the connector port. Broken fibers are easily removed with piano wire, allowing hundreds of insertions.

FiberStore supply the largest selection of bare fiber adapters connector styles on the market including SC, ST and FC bare fiber optic adaptor with stable qualities. These adapters use high quality ceramic ferrules and precise fiber connector housing parts, they are used to quickly and easily terminate the fiber to the equipment.

Typtical Fiber Patch Panels On The Market

Fiber cross connect patch panel, also known as the fiber distribution panel, to terminate the fiber optic cable and provide access to the cable’s individual fibers for cross connection, commonly used for fiber optic management unit. It helps network technicians in minimizing the clutter of wires when setting up fiber optic cables, organize and distribute the optical cables and the branches. They are used to secure the splice units, and connectors.

Benifit From Fiber Patch Panels
The fiber optic patch panels can accommodate connector panels, connectors, fiber optic patch cords, associated trunk cables, and usually come with cable management. With the use of fiber optic patch cables, network technicians can easily connect cable fibers via cross connection, test the patch panel, and connect it to lightwave equipment. These patch panels are also used as a link demarcation point and in labeling the cable’s individual fibers.

Fiber patch panels provide a convenient way to rearrange fiber cable connections and circuits. A simple patch panel is a metal frame containing bushings in which fiber optic cable connectors plug in on either side. One side of the panel is usually fixed, meaning that the fiber cables are not intended to be disconnected. On the other side of the panel, fiber cables can be connected and disconnected to arrange the circuits as required.

A fiber optic patch panel is a built-in unit for fiber optics management. It has an appearance of a box enclosure. However, it does more than just serve as protection to several sets of fibers being used for communications. It can also serve as a mechanism in which you can handle the fibers easily and conveniently to serve your purpose. It is here that you can route fiber optic cables, add connections, or put a stop to its functions just as the ordinary junction box does to your electrical wires. With telephone companies, cable TV and Internet service providers now using fiber optics to deliver services to your home, you may find it necessary to install one of this in your home.

Componets Of Fiber Patch Panel
A fiber patch panel usually is composed of two parts, the compartment that contains fiber adapters (bulkhead receptacles), and the compartment that contains fiber optic splice trays and excess fiber cables. If the entire installation, including the fiber optic hubs, repeaters, or network adapters, uses the same type of fiber optic connectors, then the array can be made of compatible adapters or jacks.

The adaptors on a fiber-optic patch panel can come in a variety of different shapes. In most panels, all of the adapters are of the same type, but if there is more than one type of fiber optic connector used within the network, it may be necessary to get a panel with hybrid adapters. These types of adapters can be used to connect different types of connectors on fiber-optic cables.

Typical Types
There are two types of panels you can have. You can have either a wall-mounted one or a rack panel.

A wall-mounted device, which, in its most basic form, can keep 12 different fibers separate from one another. If the fiber-optic cable has more than 12 fibers, the extra fibers can be moved to a second panel or an engineer can use a panel that is designed to hold more fibers separately. Wall-mounted panels can be constructed to hold up to 144 fibers at once. Wall mount fiber patch panels are space saving and light in weight, while they are strong structure and robust, waterproof. The fiber optic cables lines are designed to be easy to find and organize, optical fiber bend radius is ensured to safe level not to affect its performance.

Rack mount fiber optic patch panels are made of high quality materials, it is sliding types like a drawer. Sliding the panel open gives an optical engineer easy access to the fibers inside.Inside the rack mount fiber patch panel there is trays and splice sleeves, accessories, optional pigtails with different types, common style is SC/FC/ST/LC, E2000 types can be custom made based on quantity.

Both of rack mount and wall mount fiber optic patch panels can be custom made with different kinds of adapters and Fiber Pigtails pre-installed from FiberStore. If you do not have enough space in your place and if you do not have too many fiber optic cables around, you can have your panel mounted on a wall. Otherwise, you will need a rack on which you can place your cable panel.